Jump to content

MartyFouts

+Premium Members
  • Posts

    357
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by MartyFouts

  1. It strikes me that this hobby (it ain't a sport, guys, chill,) is better if it's more inclusive, not less. If you keep the different kinds of caches clearly separated, people can use their taste to visit only those sorts of caches they like, and there should be 'something for everyone'. On the other hand, if you don't support a kind of cache, you are, in effect, limiting access. If a GPS is involved and there's an easy way to categorize it, it ought to be allowed and the category ought to be supported. Some people love multicaches, some never bother. Should we delete multicaches because some people don't like them? Substituted whatever you don't like for 'multicache'...
  2. I just discovered locationless caches a couple days ago. I think of them as a different category than traditional caches, and I find them quiet fun. There are, it seems to me, (at least) three kinds of locationless classes, Puzzles, those that move and those that don't, and each can provide entertainment in a different way. 1) puzzle caches (go to coordinates composed from your birthday) are great for people who like solving puzzles and want a little activity while doing it. 2) Non-moving caches (where's your city-hall) are good for people who are mobility impaired, bringing the hobby to a wider audience. They also can be used to motivate people to study their community more, and even to get in contact with other geocachers (see Sisters) 3) Moving caches (the infamous yellow jeep) are good 'car game' caches for people traveling with kids, or otherwise looking to break up boredom while driving around. It is possible to overdo it and create a locationless cache that's "too easy" but that's no different than creating a 1/1 physical cache that's within 50' of a parking lot. There are two good reasons for very easy caches: 1) Include the mobility impaired in the hobby 2) Provide entertainment for families
  3. I just discovered locationless caches a couple days ago. I think of them as a different category than traditional caches, and I find them quiet fun. There are, it seems to me, (at least) three kinds of locationless classes, Puzzles, those that move and those that don't, and each can provide entertainment in a different way. 1) puzzle caches (go to coordinates composed from your birthday) are great for people who like solving puzzles and want a little activity while doing it. 2) Non-moving caches (where's your city-hall) are good for people who are mobility impaired, bringing the hobby to a wider audience. They also can be used to motivate people to study their community more, and even to get in contact with other geocachers (see Sisters) 3) Moving caches (the infamous yellow jeep) are good 'car game' caches for people traveling with kids, or otherwise looking to break up boredom while driving around. It is possible to overdo it and create a locationless cache that's "too easy" but that's no different than creating a 1/1 physical cache that's within 50' of a parking lot. There are two good reasons for very easy caches: 1) Include the mobility impaired in the hobby 2) Provide entertainment for families
  4. and I don't care. Sign me up for the camp that likes to use geocaching as an excuse to explore new places. Marty
  5. I leave a small plastic dinosaur, but don't consider it trade goods because they are cheap. I only leave them in caches that are likely to be found by families and kids.
  6. I've seen a few in caches. The ones that are strictly business cards seem tacky, but the ones that are sort of like 'Geocacher calling cards' seemed OK enough to me that I've just printed some up and plan to use them. My personal rule is that they extend my cache log entry and don't count as trade goods and I won't put them in a crowded cache. I'm also laminating a few, that have been augmented with travel bug instructions, that I'm going to include with the travel bugs I'm going to send out.
  7. The Vista doesn't keep comments in the waypoint log, as far as I can tell. The best you seem able to do is put a bit of information in the waypoint name.
×
×
  • Create New...