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BiT

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Posts posted by BiT

  1. Hate it when the post doesn't come through! Oh, well.

     

    A nearby county has six possible highpoints listed at Highpointers. It's a beautiful area. I maintain a trail there. I would like to bring EarthCachers to all six of the possible high points, and have them take elevation readings. (Photos of GPS with elevation required.) Hopefully, that way we could determine which of the six is actually the highest point! I'm off to find the last two tomorrow. It would probably be a 4.5 for terrain due to necessary bushwhacking through mountain laurel and greenbriar (not to mention the bear in the area).

    The question is whether this would fulfill the requirements for an EarthCache?

     

    As long as you talk about the geophysical aspects.

    • What are they made of?
    • How were they formed?
    • What erosional processes are present?
    • etc...

     

    Look at my highpoint: The Top of Ohio

  2. Yes, you need to get permission from the college or university, I have two on college campuses.

     

    The Ohio State University: That Building is Built of 40 Types of Ohio Stone

     

    Ohio Wesleyan University: A College Birth & A Presidential Romance

     

    At OWU, I went through the Administration Department and at Ohio State I went through the Geology Department and the Administration Department.

  3. Another situation to contemplate.

     

    How many EarthCaches do we want to start having? Does every waterfall, natural arch, cave, quarry, mine, or etc... need to be an EarthCache? Like every cemetery now having a geocache, or do we just want to have an example in a given area? How would you then define that area-US State, Canadian Providence, Country, World Region?

     

    I have an opportunity to develop a lot more EarthCaches but I'm somewhat reluctant since they are not as "quality" orientated. They just don't have that "Wow" factor or what a cool location.

  4. A situation to contemplate.

     

    An existing geocache is hidden within a park. The geocache doesn't have any information of the geophysical feature other then the geocache has the general feature in its name. The Parks Department has approved and is excited about an EarthCache at the location and but the geocache owner doesn't want to "share" the park. The geocache was approved by the park so they know of it existence.

     

    What do you do?

    • Place the EarthCache 0.1 mi. away from the geocache?
    • What if you cannot place the EarthCache 0.1 mi. away?
    • Place it anyway, the geocacher doesn't "own" the park?
    • Fold it up and move along, we don't want EarthCaches to become like geocaches (every big box parking lot with a skirt lifter or cemetery having a geocache)?

     

    What are you thoughts?

  5. Has a geocache ever ruined your possibility for an EarthCache?

     

    I found two neat locations and started my research to contact the the landowners for permission and come to find out that there was quite a stir in the local area a few years back (circa end of 2005-2006) when a large camouflaged ammo box was found at one of the locations. The stir involved the local sheriff and fire department coming to the scene to dispose of the ammo box. It seems the the geocache owner did not have permission from the landowner. Then one snowy afternoon the landowner was out walking his property and notices a lot of human footprint crossing his land. He follows them to the site and only to notice they stop at an ammo box that was uncover and sticking out of the snow. He didn't know what it was only that it was of "military" nature and he left it alone and called the authorities.

     

    Now back to 2008 and needles to say, permission was NOT granted. The trespassing, the "bomb" like ammo box, and whole idea of leading more people to the area was the last straw. The landowner hopes to never see an ammo box, a geocache or geocacher on his property again.

  6. What I usually do when I find an interesting location is do some basic preliminary research. If the site is on public access land I usually plan a visit to snap some photographs and waypoints. Heck, if I cannot get permission for listing, at least I got to visit and explore the area. This is just as fun in my book. If the location is on private property, I do the research about ownership then contact the owner for permission. I do not visit unless given permission by the property owner. In Ohio the local county auditor's office usually has an online database with geo-referenced maps. Once permission is granted, I then go into full gear doing the research and write-up. Most of the time I get permission to visit locations but not to post them as EarthCaches. To date, I have never be denied a visit after being denied listing as an EarthCache.

  7. Not so much denied as not responded to by the metroparks for one at Ohio's largest living sand dunes. I would have preferred to have been denied, at least I would have gotten a response.

     

    Be persistent-call, write, and email or better yet stop into the admin. office or by the Ranger Station at the park.

  8. I just got turned down on a location called The Devil's Tea Table. It is a pillar/balanced rock located on private property.

     

    The property owner doesn't want it published because he has enough problems the the local college kids coming to the location party. He even caught two of the college kids smoking pot around a bon fire on a Red Flag Alert day.

  9. Well I assumed that no meant no with a physical cache, but what I'm wondering is 1) Should I (not Can I) have a traditional and physical so close together and 2) does the "proof" of attendance have to coincide with the earthcache itself? ie: There is a boardwalk viewing platform at the site. Could proof be as simple as identifying the one tree right next to the boardwalk since you learned about what kind of tree it was at the learning center? Everything you can learn about the earthcache itself is easily found online so it wouldn't be much help as a proof marker.

     

    Before you get too far, does the location you have in mind have anything to do with an unique geoscience feature or aspect of our Earth? I don't think tree identification will qualify.

  10. We love earthcaches. We've never visited any location where the kids asked so many questions. There are just a handful scattered throughout Arkansas but we're working at hiding some now. It's tough finding information for some of the sites but we're working on it. :anibad:

     

    Don't know what part of Arkansas you are in but take a look at the Little Missouri Falls that are SE of Big Fork. I was going to try to develop that but I didn't save my pics from when I visited.

  11. Along the same line, I got beat out of developing an EarthCache by a few days when I went through the governing body's top level administration division and the other party got permission from the forest technician.

  12. I've notice that within the past two 6 weeks a lot of cachers have came though my area and only focused on my earthcaches.

     

    On some of my earthcaches, they have to drive right by some of my other regular caches and one of my earthcaches is just 38' feet from my 1/1 caches.

     

    Is the popularity of earthcaches on the rise? I hope so.

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