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TAZ427

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Everything posted by TAZ427

  1. Joyeux Noel Everyone! Sent my info to Laval K-9: 11/17/22 Name received from Laval K-9: 11/26/22 Sent my gift: 12/07/22 My gift arrived at destination: I received a gift: 12/05/22
  2. Joyeux Noel Everyone! Sent my info to Laval K-9: 11/17/22 Name received from Laval K-9: 11/26/22 Sent my gift: 12/07/22 My gift arrived at destination: I received a gift: 12/05/22
  3. EMAIL SENT: 09/14/2022 NAME RECEIVED BY ME: 09/25/2022 MISSION SENT BY ME: 10/17/2022 OUTGOING MISSION ARRIVED AT DESTINATION: INCOMING MISSION RECEIVED BY ME: 10/14/2022
  4. EMAIL SENT: 09/14/2022 NAME RECEIVED BY ME: 09/25/2022 MISSION SENT BY ME: Preparing OUTGOING MISSION ARRIVED AT DESTINATION: INCOMING MISSION RECEIVED BY ME:
  5. EMAIL SENT: 09/14/2022 NAME RECEIVED BY ME: MISSION SENT BY ME: OUTGOING MISSION ARRIVED AT DESTINATION: INCOMING MISSION RECEIVED BY ME:
  6. Update: 12/15/21 Sent my info to Laval K-9: 11/24/21Name received from Laval K-9: 11/27/21Sent my gift: 12/10/21My gift arrived at destination: 12/15/21 (per tracking notification.)I received a gift:
  7. Sent my info to Laval K-9: 11/24/21Name received from Laval K-9: 11/27/21Sent my gift: 12/10/21My gift arrived at destination: 12/15/21I received a gift:
  8. EMAIL SENT: September 15, 2021 NAME RECEIVED BY ME: September 26, 2021 MISSION SENT BY ME: October 9, 2021 OUTGOING MISSION ARRIVED AT DESTINATION: October 26, 2021 INCOMING MISSION RECEIVED BY ME: October 6, 2021
  9. I'm in! Sent my info to Laval K-9: Feb 26thName received from Laval K-9: March 6thSent my gift: March 10thMy gift arrived at destination:I received a gift: March 11th Updated: Shipped out gift!
  10. I'm in this year! Sent my info to Laval K-9: 11/14/2020Name received from Laval K-9: 11/28/2020Sent my gift: 12/09/2020My gift arrived at destination:I received a gift: 12/07/2020 Info Updated 12/09/2020
  11. Yes you can. You can select/deselect the gpx files you want to be active/inactive on the device via the filter screen. That's probably one of the nicest new features I've seen to date. I end up using c:geo and have the specific caches in separate lists to do this, it would be nice to have on the GPSr.
  12. Yes. Previously, if a LIVE GC upload was made, any GPX/GGZ data already on your device was completely removed from the SQL database, leaving you only the information brought by the LIVE GC upload for the geocaches in that upload. If the LIVE GC data was 'removed' from the Oregon 7xx via the Geocaching Options on the device, existing GPX/GGZ data was not restored, leaving you with no information for those geocaches. Firmware 2.70 now simply recognizes when you already have GPX/GGZ information on your device for geocaches in the LIVE GC upload and does not change anything for those caches. Of course, this means you can not get any updated or newer information for these, so they still have not implemented the best solution, but it is an improvement. I was really hoping they would either do as before, and overwrite the SQL database with the newer information UNTIL you remove the LIVE data, and then restore the GPX/GGZ data already on the device, OR simply show both the LIVE GC geocache data AND the device GPX/GGZ geocache data simultaneously, like they used to show both GC.com and Opencaching.com data simultaneously. IE, you might have two listing for the same cache, one is from the device GPX/GGZ data, the other is from the LIVE GC upload. Simply adding a special symbol or note to the listing would help the user differentiate between the LIVE GC and GPX/GGZ entries. GARMIN, are you listening? I'd like it to update to the latest online information, just so long as it uses my account and corrected coordinates. If it doesn't use this, then I don't want it overwriting my GPX/GGZ unless I explicitly tell it to.
  13. It is documented here 8^) This is pretty much my point. It's known well enough to be documented on wiki's but it's not in official Garmin documentation such as their User Manual http://static.garmincdn.com/pumac/Oregon_6xx_OM_EN.pdf I ended up learning more about my device from the garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com than I did from Garmin (i.e. manual and their webpages.) I don't know when that page came about, but I didn't find it until sometime after Geowoodstock 2013 at which point I had it a couple weeks before going to Geowoodstock 2013 and then got to spend a lot of time getting very familiar with it's capabilities as we had a long roadtrip from Houston, TX to Lakeland, FL Overall I still love my Oregon 600, but there's just those couple of things that I need to complain about on occasion. My pet peeve was probably more about the fact that Garmin didn't document that you need to calibrate it every time and also implied that it was calibrated from the factory and would auto-calibrate over time in their manual which either it did a crap job of it or didn't do it at all. I won't give Garmin any credit for a community driven wiki page that has it documented well.
  14. I suspect the material and charge level inside each battery affects the compass reading to some small degree, and the calibration is to offset that value. Each time the batteries are removed, the GPSr must assume the newly installed batteries are not the same batteries removed, and re-calibrate to the 'new' batteries. While there is some small amount of truth to this, it's should be minimal, hence the some small degree. It appears to reset to the factory calibration, which is awful (at least on mine and every person that I know IRL that ones one.) I even tried it with their 'Battery Pack' that I borrowed for a test and still had the same experience. The manual actually states that it was calibrated at the factory, and uses automatic calibrating by default. And it says nothing about needing to re-calibrate after replacing the batteries or that it goes back to factory calibration settings (which appears to be the case, and which are complete crap.) I've never seen it auto calibrate - I've used it for couple long days of caching with frustration the compass being bad and it never got better when I first bought it. It wasn't until I did some looking online and found others that had discovered you need to recalibrate it after changing the batteries did I figure this out. I'd even accept it to a degree if Garmin would have put it in their documentation something like "For best performance, you should re-calibrate the compass after swapping out batteries"
  15. My 650 froze so often I returned it to Garmin after 11 months. Many people said theirs was fine. Garmin replaced it with a brand new one - which did exactly the same thing. Sometimes I would be removing batteries and putting them back in 3 times an hour. (I'm fairly sure it's power related as when the batteries discharge somewhat it actually gets more stable) I get that occasionally on my 600. There is no rhyme or reason to it. Sometimes I can go all day with no issues, other times I need to pull the batteries several times an outing. (For the record, my GPSMAP 62s also did this, so I think it's a common element in some of the firmwares). My caching buddy uses "find next closest" quite a bit, and you have to wait a bit before actually pressing it. I think the device takes a bit to mark the cache as being found. We both use GGZ files when we load our devices with GSAK. Never pulled the batter for the lockup. I simply hold the power button until it powers down and then power it back up. I prefer not to pull the battery as that means I need to recalibrate the compass. Which is another pet-peeve of mine. Why does the compass calibration go out when you pull the battery. I'd think they'd keep the info in long term data storage, but it doesn't appear that way as my compass is never happy after pulling the batteries. One recommendation is to user key (button below the power key) quick push to toggle the screen. It makes life a lot easier if you're hiking and you toggle the screen off as it also stops the touch screen actions (i.e. you're not in some remote menu or didn't accidentally change all your filter settings from it bouncing around.) After you use it a couple times this way, it becomes second nature to hit the button when you grab it to look at at and when you put it away. Everything else stays active with the screen is off, and the on is near instantaneous so it's a great feature.
  16. Last month the garmin let me down - I'd loaded caches from gsak as usual, tested they were all there, set it to the first one. I arrived and did the first cache, hit "Find next closest" (extremely useful feature) and... Nothing. It had lost every other cache. So I switched to the phone and C:Geo. I had to miss the next two caches as I climbed the hill far enough to get a signal, and c:geo took about 20 minutes of weak signal to load the 20 other caches I wanted to do, but it did so and I was able to rescue most of the day. I mention this because it was the first time I used C:Geo for an extended time and it wasn't as good for me - in fact I ended up copying the coords of each cache onto the garmin and setting them as a waypoint for navigating. The "Going backwards" issue is my assumption of why C:Geo would freeze. The screen would stop responding and eventually Android would give its "No longer responding, Wait/Close" warning and I had to bail out. I then learned that if I didn't go from cache to cache each time, instead navigating back from each cache once done to the first menu page, the crashes stopped. So I'm assuming, rightly or wrongly, that it's not freeing memory when used in the way I was doing so. (The phone is a Moto-G4, 2gb ram and plenty of onboard memory, everything else runs well) I don't want to be negative about c:geo because it's the best I've tried and it's truly awesome that it's free and not crippled with adverts. It's just... I don't find the interface as intuitive as Garmin (personal choice) although every feature I want is there, somewhere... It is difficult to be fair and impartial because each of us forms a strong routine for doing this stuff; we have a personal set of tools, systems and methods and there is probably a default negative position when we have to change from that routine. Much as I like tinkering with software and maps, I'd rather things worked perfectly and as I want them when I'm out and caching, allowing me to focus more on my surroundings than on the technology. My perfect system probably will never exist unless I write it, and its user base will be exactly 1 if I do. I had pretty much the same question. And with the exception of maybe opening a list w/ > 30K geocaches in it. I've seldom seen it crash in the past 5yrs or so (not sense the first few months or so after the group of Android developers took it over from Caramichael or whatever the original creators name was back in 2011 - and then the few issues do to API changes from Groundspeak which were quickly patched.) That said, i've got the same caches stored on my phone as my GPSr. I tend to sync them together w/ GSAK every couple weeks or so and keep all caches w/i about 65mi fresh. The one advantage that c:geo has is definitely being able to update caches as occasionally when looking you want to pull old logs, pictures, and sometimes even the refresh you'll find out that the cache was removed and archived the day before I have had the Oregon do the freeze when trying to get Hints, Logs, and other Details. And also had it select the same cache that I'm at when hitting find next cache (got to let it sit for several seconds after marking cache as found to avoid this.) Like was mentioned everyone has there own routines. I prefer my Oregon 600 while walking a trail to grab caches and c:geo when Navigating to a cache by car. And I'll more often then not pull out my phone if I want extra details about a cache, or if I want a quick Sat elite view. As far as accuracy. I can't say I see much difference between my Galaxy S5 vs my Oregon 600. And I'd say my S5 was better than my Oregon 450 was (no GLONASS on the 450)
  17. Yeah, the ones where the distance is different, but there's ones that the distance was the same, but on different listing sites.
  18. Not sure why you'd use the Macro. I've been using the standard File -> Export GPX/POI/GGZ option for a few years now. First on my Oregon 450 and then on my Oregon 600. I use .ggz on my 600. Works like a charm. I've had as many as 100K in my .ggz file and it's no problem. It basically packs them into tiles of gpx's inside the ggz and only pulls out what's needed, so it may only have several thousand on screen. Right now it can support more than the total active geocaches in existence, so even if it is a 4M geocache limit it's beyond what's realistically needed. I had similar questions regarding Live. Sounds like that part is buggy and it's the major change going from the 600 to the 700 that I was interested in. I don't mind plugging in a cable when downloading my .gpx/.ggz from GSAK or loading new .img maps and .kml overlays. Not worth the upgrade to the 700 from the 600. But I'd definitely say I love the 600 over the 400 series. The touch screen is much more sensitive and accurate, about like a smartphone, and the best part is that it's like reading paper when in full sunlight (I turn the backlighting down really low - not quite off, I need to be able to see it when I first turn it on if at night.) I'd also highly recommend programming the lower button as a quick button to toggle the screen off. It does to things, 1 - saves the battery by turning the screen off when you're not using it and 2 - Prevents the tons of touches the screen will get if you're walking around with it clipped on your pack/beltloop/... as you'll end up in some menu somewhere, changing settings (especially the cache filters - and you know there was supposed to be a cache here - why isn't it showing up now...) You'll get use to grabbing it, quick push the screen's on, looking, quick push screen's off put it back... For what it's worth, the differences in operating between the 400 series and the 600/700 series aren't that difficult to figure out. Put it in geocaching mode, click geocache icon, you got three tabs up top - The left most (looks like a play button i.e. triangle pointed to the right ) shows the current selected cache - you can get the description, logs, hints, coordinates, log it .. from that screen, the middle one (looks like a geocache box) shows the list of nearby geoaches, the right most has (filter icon - looks like a funnel) has the filter options - when you look at it it's pretty self explanatory - grey'd out means it's filtered out. You may need to spend some time figuring a few things out, but it's mostly intuitive. I don't know if you downloaded the free OSM maps for your 450, but I'd not pay Garmin for what you can get more accurate and up to date maps for free. I'd recommend looking at this website - which gives details about how to load them and a list of various sites to get them from. http://garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com/Maps I like the maps from https://www.openmapchest.org/ for my country/content maps. I've used them in North America, South America and Europe. If you have any questions on how to do this send a message to me on Geocaching.com (TAZ427) - Don't message me through the forum as I don't check it frequently, if you message me through geocaching.com I'll get it and respond quickly. Why are there duplicate (and triplicate) listings in the cache list? I probably should have snagged another picture off the internet. I believe the other's are from the now defunct OpenCaching.com (Garmin gave up on having it's own listing service) and parking Waypoints. I've never loaded them so I never see them. A couple more images are more typical This one shows it with D/T info in a star system and black background (Auto switches to the black background at night) There's also other options to have more are less details as to the direction and distance to cache (i.e. have degrees vs NW general info)
  19. Not sure why you'd use the Macro. I've been using the standard File -> Export GPX/POI/GGZ option for a few years now. First on my Oregon 450 and then on my Oregon 600. I use .ggz on my 600. Works like a charm. I've had as many as 100K in my .ggz file and it's no problem. It basically packs them into tiles of gpx's inside the ggz and only pulls out what's needed, so it may only have several thousand on screen. Right now it can support more than the total active geocaches in existence, so even if it is a 4M geocache limit it's beyond what's realistically needed. I had similar questions regarding Live. Sounds like that part is buggy and it's the major change going from the 600 to the 700 that I was interested in. I don't mind plugging in a cable when downloading my .gpx/.ggz from GSAK or loading new .img maps and .kml overlays. Not worth the upgrade to the 700 from the 600. But I'd definitely say I love the 600 over the 400 series. The touch screen is much more sensitive and accurate, about like a smartphone, and the best part is that it's like reading paper when in full sunlight (I turn the backlighting down really low - not quite off, I need to be able to see it when I first turn it on if at night.) I'd also highly recommend programming the lower button as a quick button to toggle the screen off. It does to things, 1 - saves the battery by turning the screen off when you're not using it and 2 - Prevents the tons of touches the screen will get if you're walking around with it clipped on your pack/beltloop/... as you'll end up in some menu somewhere, changing settings (especially the cache filters - and you know there was supposed to be a cache here - why isn't it showing up now...) You'll get use to grabbing it, quick push the screen's on, looking, quick push screen's off put it back... For what it's worth, the differences in operating between the 400 series and the 600/700 series aren't that difficult to figure out. Put it in geocaching mode, click geocache icon, you got three tabs up top - The left most (looks like a play button i.e. triangle pointed to the right ) shows the current selected cache - you can get the description, logs, hints, coordinates, log it .. from that screen, the middle one (looks like a geocache box) shows the list of nearby geoaches, the right most has (filter icon - looks like a funnel) has the filter options - when you look at it it's pretty self explanatory - grey'd out means it's filtered out. You may need to spend some time figuring a few things out, but it's mostly intuitive. I don't know if you downloaded the free OSM maps for your 450, but I'd not pay Garmin for what you can get more accurate and up to date maps for free. I'd recommend looking at this website - which gives details about how to load them and a list of various sites to get them from. http://garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com/Maps I like the maps from https://www.openmapchest.org/ for my country/content maps. I've used them in North America, South America and Europe. If you have any questions on how to do this send a message to me on Geocaching.com (TAZ427) - Don't message me through the forum as I don't check it frequently, if you message me through geocaching.com I'll get it and respond quickly.
  20. Don't do that just yet. The 7x0 series does not automatically load your PQ's, but when it does work, you can manually load them, as well as geocaches anywhere on the map, in batches of 25. Problem (and a huge one) is, Groundspeak only sends the basic information for each cache (even for your PQ's), and the GPSr is only allowed to load the pertinent information (the information you need to actually find the cache) when you actually open each individual cache to view it. So, if you are out of wifi or cell phone service when you want to view the cache data, not gonna happen, unless you already had it loaded before you left the house, which is exactly what you already do with the 6x0 series. Thanks, I watched a couple video's and it looked like they were just using a generic API App to load local info (and of course needing to be Wirelessly tethered via cellphone hotspot.) From what you said, it sounds like it wouldn't load the extra information like cache notes and edited coordinates on Mystery/Puzzle caches. This is the biggest PIA that I deal with on my GPSr (and Smartphone.) I use GSAK and then refresh my caches (About 12K in my local area w/ 50mi radius PQ's over time spans...) I still seem to end up in the field going to the wrong location on occasion thinking that I'm going to the solved coords or not seeing it on my GPSr. It's a bit better on my phone using c:geo as I get the pencil icon over the cache for anything that's got notes or has coords updated and I can at least refresh it. Anyway if I effectively still need to use GSAK, then even with WiFi advantages, it's not worth upgrading for me at this time.
  21. I googled for this, and looked through this thread and I can't seem to find an answer to what they heck Garmin really means by "You can set your device to automatically stay up to date with all the latest caches from Geocaching.com" Currently I own an Oregon 600, and while the WiFi, BT and App functionality addition is nice, it's not enough to convince me to upgrade. But reading this in the features list had me question what exactly do they mean. Does it go read you PQs when you're connected to WiFi? Is it something else. I'm sure it's not as Ubiquitous as the statement implies, but it may be enough to convince me to buy a 700 and ebay my 600.
  22. Not really worried about that, it would only be the SSID that's being broadcast it's a short burst packet that's relatively infrequent, there should be no notable impact from collisions w/o traffic, heck I'd use the same channel I've got my router on, which I tend to move around as neighbors change their equipment/get new neighbors, so that I keep mine in the most open band available. Plus the strength of the little AP I'm using is crap compared to my router.
  23. That's an interesting idea. I've got an old AP that's not in use (had it setup as a gateway to network a remote printer which has since been replaced by a WiFi capable printer.) I could set it up so that you should be able to see it at the street in front of the house. If not, I'll grab my old WRT54G which I know you could see out at the street. And most people can use a WiFi Analyser App on their smartphones to pick up the SSID. I could do a couple of caches requiring them to go by the house. Maybe one day I'll even setup it up w/ a server and make people solve a puzzle on it or something like that. You are correct. I had to tweak it (barely) once in the few years I have had it running. It is in a parks building that is not climate controlled - so cold in the winter and hot in the summer. There's a little bit of rubber band in the pot to keep things from wiggling around. Thanks, this will be indoor, but I use a programmable thermostat so when I'm not there it could be between 60-90deg.
  24. I've seen some higher end ones w/ 0.5W power for $50-60 (on sale)but was really trying to keep it below $20, I may just go with the Canakit (self assemble $17 and I'd toss an AC/DC adapter on there but no need for details.) Looks like it has a trim pot on it to adjust the frequency, how sensitive is it, and do you know if it drifts with temp thus channel drifting?
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