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bcblues

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Everything posted by bcblues

  1. So get an iPod/iPhone, Nuvi, and netbook with cell-internet. Or just get the droid.
  2. Yikes, I don't know. I have always been uber-careful and clean when installing Zagg on devices. I wash my hands well, never touch the adhesive side (I use an exacto knife to handle the "untouchable" shield after the backing is removed. I also liberally apply the spray to both screen and shield, then "lay" the shield down from one side to the other (with the exacto knife instead of my grubby fingers). I squeegee out as much of the excess spray as possible, and gently work out all I can with my fingers before the spray dissipates and the adhesive sets. There WILL be some small pockets under the screen, and it will look like crap at first, but it will all work out in the next day or so, and look great.
  3. Yikes, I don't know. I have always been uber-careful and clean when installing Zagg on devices. I wash my hands well, never touch the adhesive side (I use an exacto knife to handle the "untouchable" shield after the backing is removed. I also liberally apply the spray to both screen and shield, then "lay" the shield down from one side to the other (with the exacto knife instead of my grubby fingers). I squeegee out as much of the excess spray as possible, and gently work out all I can with my fingers before the spray dissipates and the adhesive sets. There WILL be some small pockets under the screen, and it will look like crap at first, but it will all work out in the next day or so, and look great.
  4. That is true, TotemLake. The 62 series does apparently have more "horsepower" than the 60 series. But then again, Garmin touts LONGER battery life for the 62 series. Of course, to continue on the car analogy, the new Corvette gets better mileage than the old ones, and has more HP....... I guess that was what I was hoping was happening with the new 62 series - better efficiency. Apparently not.
  5. I would prefer to work with gpx if possible. I like being able to "paperless cache". I guess loading micro sd cards with geographic regions is the way to go - of course keeping no gpx files on the internal memory. Too bad. I just cn't figure out why there has to be a limit with gpx when there is not with poi.
  6. I have exceeded the limits of my 62s's 5000 cache limit. Does anybody have any idea of how the 62s parses this data and decides which ones to load into memory? I am willing to (but not excited about) using multiple Micro SD cards to "manage" geocaches. But a smartphone solution is looking better and better.....
  7. Well, today, I ran another "test" of a day caching. Started out with half-flush disposable alkalines, and swapped them out when they winked out. Put in a set of Eneloop which I had just pulled off the charger this morning. I went &+ hours with the4 Eneloops and the4y still showed 100% (which I have 0% confidence in) after another 8 hours of caching (15 seconds backlight - Battery Save on). Maybe I CAN live with it.............. I would be nonplussed with the battery life, IF I had not used the 60Cx, with which I could hike for 2 DAYS on a single set of disposable alkalines.
  8. All right, I can probably provide little insight into this pissing match, and I WILL pick up an ANDROID next month. But just today, I dropped my GPSr, and I have a hunch it would have (not helped) actually KILLED my cell phone. Just saying..... But I seriously WOULD have been carrying my cell phone if it offered caching and instant logging........ dadgum. Room for both (although I would keep my GPSr for hiking in the mountains anyway - but I would probably go for a 60csx, as my old (borrowed) 60cx was an old reliable at 26+ hours battery life.
  9. I am still rocking 2.60. I will probably update soon.
  10. First, welcome to geocaching! 1. I have been downloading individual caches from GC.com, but if I am out hiking is there anyway I can obtain them through the GPS without already having them downloaded? No, you cannot do that with the Oregon. You CAN create a Pocket Query which can contain hundreds of caches, and load it as a single file onto your Oregon. You will need to have an idea of where you will be caching, however. 2. When I download the chaches to the GPS, it puts in the cache#, is there anyway to also put in the cache name? Yes, you can change to the cache name by brining up the menu while in the geocaching screen. Then go to Setup Geocaches, and under Geocache List, change it to Show Names. This is how it is done on my 62s, and I think the menu structure is pretty similar on the Oregon. 3. What is a or are PGX files? I think you mean GPX files. It is an XML based file structure which contains the cache location, description, hints, logs, etc for a single or a whole bunch or caches. It is the lingua franca of GPS receivers used for geocaching. 4. Last, I think.....if I mark a cache as found on the GPS how do I get it to mark it on GC.com instead of me going to the website and marking each one? Well, you still need to visit the website, but it is much easier to use Filed Notes to create your logs. Log into Geocaching.con, go to your Profile, and look about halfway down the screen on the right side margin. You will see Filed Notes, and under that Access Your Field Notes. Click on that, then click on the "Click Here" after the Oregon type GPSR (it is kind of hidden in the text a bit). Then you have to upload your Field Notes - just follow the instructions. When done, go back to your field notes, and to the right of each cache attempt that you logged there is a "Compose Log", which will do most of the work for you to create the log entry, including the Found or Not Found, and the comments (if you added them ) that you made in the field.
  11. Resurrecting this thread with some new info: I have a 62s. Battery Save mode on. Backlight set to 100% (anything else is hard for me to see in daylight), with a 2 minute timeout. I was traveling and caching the other day. I had loaded a set of PowerEx 2700 NiMH batteries which I had just purchased, and run through a breakin cycle and then topped off with a slow charge on my new Maha MH-C9000 charger. They lasted 4 hours before the GPSr winked out (without warning). Replaced them with a set of new Eneloops (also just charged) and got only 3 hours. I am beginning to think I have a defective GPSr.
  12. I agree. It is nice that Garmin is fairly responsive to the user community and is not afraid to roll out frequent upgrades. I will gladly put up with beta releases and quirks that I am confident will be ironed out in time. After all, I use my GPSr for geocaching, and hiking/biking. It is nt like it is mission critical if I have to remove the batteries for a second to clear a locked GPSr. Now, if I were using the GPSr to fly a fighter jet, or navigate an ambulance to a waiting patient, I would feel differently. But they have other GPS solutions for those uses.....
  13. I don't see this on the Garmin website.....
  14. I have had my 62s lock up on several screens (map, compass, logging a find, adding a comment) on every new version except the one that came on the unit. Sometimes several times a day.
  15. I am using a 62s now, after using a 60Cx for a while. I use Trimble survey grade GPSr at work. I do not use a smart phone as of yet, but I have been sorely considering getting one, and the geocaching apps are just another reason supporting getting one. I will always have a GPSr, as I hike, mountain bike, etc, and I just have become reliant on having one with me. But honestly, I really like the ability to grab and go with a smart phone app, and really, REALLY like the fact that I would never have to deal with PQ (Pocket Query) again. I see the ideal situation as using both in conjunction with each other, but I can also see that either would be sufficient alone in most caching situations. I will likely get a smart phone (leaning towards a Droid of some flavor) in the near future. Not JUST for geoacaching, but I assume it will be used for geocaching. Just my 2 cents worth. And BTW, I am a relative newcomer to geocaching too, so mo need to point out my relatively low cache count.....
  16. You may want to consider a unit (regardless of brand) that includes a barometric altimeter and an electronic compass. The altimeter is useful if you are hiking in mountains, and the electronic compass (IMHO) is very useful for both hiking and geocaching. The electronic compass basically allows you to stand in one place and swing around with the electronic compass always pointing north. With a GPS compass, it derives north by plotting your movement, so it doesn't work well when stationary). As others have said, the SD (or micro SD) slot is useful to add maps and geocaches. You should really look for a mapping unit, since the topo maps displayed on screen are tremendously useful for both geocaching and hiking.
  17. I had a 60 and now have a 62s. The menus are different, but I find the menu system easier to use than the 60. There is always the option to use the "classic" menu system, which I believe is the same interface as the 60. I never felt the need, and have never looked back! I really like the new page feature which steps through a list (which you can set up any way you want) of favorite pages!
  18. bcblues

    GPS Accuracy

    It is worse under leaf cover, or in canyons (especially urban canyons between buildings). It is due to multipathing, which is (basically) the signal from the satellite arriving from the direct path, plus arriving after bouncing off one or more objects (leaves, buildings, etc), thereby getting the same signal separated by a fraction of a second. Some GPSr units are better than others at figuriong out which signal is the direct signal. Even survey grade GPSr have inherent error at any given moment. I use Trimble survey grade GPSr units at work, and even they will "wander" a bit. You can actually see this when you average a point reading. As others have said, if you get within 30 feet of a cache using your GPSr, that is typically pretty decent performance (at least usable). That is when your eyes and brain should kick into "geocache mode". Remember, the person who hid the cahe may have been using a cell phone or older (less accurate) GPSr to establish the point anyway. So the original coordinates could have been anywhere within a 15 foot (or 30 foot, or even 50 foot) radius of the listed coordinate. Then you come back with your GPSr, which also has error. Get close enough using the GPSr, then switch to "human geocaching mode"
  19. btw, the ipod entry discount is down to 20% off. Still, the $3 offsets shipping. Thanks for the heads up on the discount!
  20. I put the zagg shields on all my portable electronics. I just ordered one for my 62s. The zagg material IS stickier on touch screen models (like my cell phone). But it protects like no other and will literally last the life of the electronics it is protecting. On my 62s, I am not worried about the stickier feel, as it is not a touch screen model. When you install, you MUST make sure the screen is squeaky clean, and then using the spray that comes with it you install the shield. small bubbles will work their way out over the course of a week or so, so don't worry about them. The more you use it the quicker it will clear up.
  21. bcblues

    Help Me Decide!

    If you loved your Oregon, I don't see any reason not to get another. I think it all comes down to wanting a touch screen or buttons (at least now that the screen brightness issue seems to be resolved). For me, using the GPSr on a mountain bike just seems easier with buttons. Plus the screen brightness (IMHO) on the 60 and 62 series is about as dim as I would care to go. The text entry is certainly not all that great with the 62, but it is workable. That is really the only down-side I see to the 62.
  22. I don't have an oregon, but I think you just go into the menu on the map page and select which layers (maps) you want to display. That is how it works on my 62s.
  23. Yes, you can charge 1, 2, 3, or 4 batteries in the charger. But when I charge more than one, it never terminates, and instead I get the blinking lights. One cell at a time charges perfectly. My Maha will be here soon. Somegeek: I did look at the Lacrosse BC-700, but after reading about the fire issues (with the 900/9009 series, I think), I just couldn't trust it charging unattended. Besides, I had a Maha (401 I think), that served me well for years. I would happily use it again, except I lost it in a move. I got the Maha c9000 charger and 4 2700 mha Powerex batteries (not hybrids) for $50 shipped (newegg.com special). I also ordered 8 eneloop aa cells, and 4 aaa eneloops from amazon. So I should be set now. The NiZn batteries will be useful once the weather turns cold here in America's Outback.
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