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eagletrek

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Posts posted by eagletrek

  1. Actually the new ACU pattern is the resurrection of the old Duo-Tex pattern that was used by the 2D ACR in the FRG during the early eighties. The pattern works well at a distance, but up close, the straight lines of the pixels are a dead giveaway that it's man-made. Therefore, I don't think it would work well for geocaching.

     

    Would creating smaller pixels help it be less noticeable at closer distances? I ask because I've seen some pictures that seem to be pretty close up of rifles and other items painted in this camo that look like they blend in pretty well.

     

    How close is close???? I guess you could try anything but an observant eye at close range, 10 feet or less, will probably pick up on the straight edges of the pixels thereby defeating the purpose of the pattern. BTW, I'd never use the ACU pattern as it would be really time consuming to paint.

  2. While some of the paint jobs seen in previous posts are nice, one of the main principles of camo has been neglected. In trying to camo something, breaking up the shape of the item can be more important than what color or pattern you paint on it. Just how many "straight lines" do you find in nature???

    I'm pretty pleased with my boxes' ability to blend.

     

    While I didn't discuss this issue in detail in this very old thread, I did discuss it in the thread that was current as of last week.

     

    I'm glad you are!!!! It still doesn't change the fact that there aren't too many places in nature where straight lines exist. Even so-called "well hidden" caches hidden in fallen tree limbs are fairly easy to find if you are observant and notice the straight "cut line" left by a saw blade. Paint on and cache on!!!!!!

  3. Actually there is no way to leave "NO" trace.

     

    Everything there is even the critters leave a trace of their passings.

     

    My main concern and I got a letter from our local Forest Ranger is geocachers who remove things other than what is inside the cache.

    I have a special cache at a geologic point of interest and a long time geocacher who is suppose to be aware and is the local contact left right in their log that they just had to have some of what was there and took it home with them.

     

    Mr. Ranger was not to pleased.

    I then made a little banner for all my cache pages that reads

    LEAVE NO TRACE.

     

    I know we can not do this completely by my opening statement.

    But we can and try to leave it as good or better than we found it.

     

    That spider was not there before the cache...he came after.

    I run across critters all the time in the back woods.

    That's only natural your in their home.

     

    I think that the big concern is their nesting spots.

    In most states it is illegal to take things or disturb nests.

     

    Here is a good example.

    A buck was walking down the trail as he stumbled on a rock that was in the trail it disturbed the moth that had crawled under there trying to nest.

    The rock then rolled down the hill and hit a mushroom that had just sprouted and broke it off at the base.

    A nosey squirrel sitting in a tree above scampered down tearing the bark on the tree to get to the mushroom.

    The buck turned to see what the commotion was and caught its horn in a spider web that was across the trail tearing it down as the spider frantically hung to the horn.

     

    It is really up to each and everyone of us to be aware and do the best we can to leave things for others in the best way we can.

    Being responsible is a BIG thing.

     

    What are the things that are being missed in this: http://www.lnt.org/programs/principles.php

     

    Ya know the LNT folks would be better served if someone checked out their photos before they used them for promotional purposes. I wonder how the manufacturing of the tent with it's synthetic fabric and aluminum or graphite poles impacted the planet and its environment???? Have you ever seen an aluminum smelting operation and its associated infrastructure????? Based on their concept, there should be butt naked human standing on a rock overlooking the ocean.

  4. I have completely saturated the area where I live. I try really hard to make all of my hides something special and unique, because I LOVE it when people come to my area and have a spend a whole day finding my caches, and then leave good logs of their experience. Problem is, I might get one or two cachers a month who even come here, since I'm 90 minutes from the city.

     

    I have found that I actually enjoy hiding caches more than finding them. I'm really the only active cacher in town, so I have to go 25-30 miles to get a new cache. I'm a little depressed that I have pretty much done all the hiding that this area will support. Heck, I have 6 caches right now that have not been found yet!

     

    I have maybe 4 or 5 more ideas that are in the works, but after that, I'm kinda stuck. I wish there were more geocachers near where I live.

     

    Really just venting. Besides the weather sucks this weekend. Cold rain that won't let up. GRRRR....

     

    Try moving from Ada!!!!

  5. NO!!! Screw good karma!!!

     

    Even in a group, there's usually a "first" to discover/recover the cache. That said, it would seem that the individual who was "first" should "solely" get FTF honors, BTJMHO.

     

    Since I've been on the forums, I'm amazed at how folks re-define words like "first."

  6. Has anyone tried making the newer camo that the military is using? Like this..

     

    digitalcamo_sm.jpg

     

    Actually the new ACU pattern is the resurrection of the old Duo-Tex pattern that was used by the 2D ACR in the FRG during the early eighties. The pattern works well at a distance, but up close, the straight lines of the pixels are a dead giveaway that it's man-made. Therefore, I don't think it would work well for geocaching.

  7. Today, I shined my light into a hole in a tree and stuck a stick in there to see if anything was lurking deeper. In my rush to discover the micro, I totally forgot my Leave No Trace Ethics. I actually disturbed a mouse and its home in the tree.

     

    How many times have you broken branches, torn down spider webs or flattened brush in the process of looking for a cache? What is the responsibility of the geocaching community when it comes from holding cachers and cache-hiders to appropriate environmental ethics? Even if their cache doesn't disturb the environment, is there someway to ensure that the people looking for it won't be tempted to jump around on cryptobiotic soil or disturb animals' habitats in the process?

     

    My particular pet peve is microcaches hidden in back country areas. If you have a huge area with lots of great hiding places, why make the cache the size of a film canister? The bigger the cache (within reason), the smaller the environmental impact. It may sound counter-intuitive, but if you have a tiny cache that's hard to find, more destruction will be done by cachers poking around and impacting the area.

     

    What do you think?

     

    While I'm all for Leave No Trace Ethics, are you really adhereing to them yourself??? You mentioned Cryptobiotic Soil. In reading the National Park Service info sheet, I learned that: "Air pollutants, both from urban areas and coal-fired power plants, also harm these crusts." So if you're really concerned about Leave No Trace Ethics, I'm certain that you only ride a bicycle to all cache sites and the computer you're using to make this post is powered only by a wind turbine.

     

    What about the increased use of motor vehicles, of all types, that cachers use on a regular basis to partake in this sport, hobby, obsession, etc..... I can tell you that I've easily driven 30,000+ miles in finding caches since I started this "hobby." I guess I need to start walking as I've made one big imprint with "My Carbon Footprint."

  8. There will NEVER be another FTF on that cache...even if they deleted the log.

     

    I've got to agree, whether or not the cache was found legally. An FTF is an FTF whether or not the cache owner deletes the log. Trying to put FTF back in play is like trying to find a re-cycled virgin. That dog don't hunt.

     

    As far as condoning the actions of the seeker if they broke the law, I don't. But that said, legally or not, they were FTF.

  9. And then some of us don't even waste the energy to "Discover" them. Although I have 4 TBs out and about around the world, I don't play the TB or geocoin game much anymore. There are a few times I'll move one but they become somewhat of a burden if I don't cache frequently. I still have a "Red Jeep" that I need to get moving along.

  10. Well, looks like it's not going to work out after all. The admin made a point that although it was removed by someone else or accident that we all know where it originally came from and that it's still destruction of property.

     

    For all those wanting to know what the item was, it was a paver that I had found. Although they are inexpensive, it's still part of the park and I will not be placing it here, but I will place a new one somewhere nearby! Let's hope I find a good new spot!

     

    Thanks for everyone's input. :ph34r:

    Wow! You have -- whether you now it or not -- raised some serious issues here! First, a paver is not an inexpensive throwaway item -- pavers weigh from 3,000 pounds to over 20 tons, and, whether they run on gasoline or diesel fuel, even used pavers typically cost from $8,000 to $90,000, dependent upon size and weight. Personally, I believe that you were likely in violation of all kinds of state laws to even start up the paver which you found, as that would likely be considered theft, and then you would have been in violation of several laws a soon as you started the paver, moved it from where it was parked, and drove it to the park, including operating a piece of heavy machinery without an appropriate license, and theft of a valuable piece of road paving equipment. Worse, the act of leaving a paver parked in the park could be considered littering or abandonment of stolen property. May I suggest that the next time you see a paver parked somewhere in your city, you may wish to leave it exactly where it is and not drive it away? And, now I am wondering, how did you even start the engine if you did not have an ignition key? Or had the key been left in the ignition?

     

    Lastly, a paver is hardly a small and inconspicuous item. Did you REALLY expect that you could abandon a piece of heavy equipment that looks like this

     

    7000%20Conveyor%20Paver(1).jpg

     

    in a park and that NO ONE would notice? ;);)

     

    :cry:;)

     

    Evidently, VST hasn't checked the Groundspeak Store recently. They have this new "paver" "hot-wire kit" available at a reasonable price!!!! :);):D

  11.  

    <snip>

     

    I'd love a category system of some type to keep these kinds of caches in groups so urban people and wilderness people can all have caches they enjoy without sifting through other kinds they don't. I've already got micros filtered out of my pocket queries, I'd love to have the ability to only find caches in the woods.

     

    Excellent idea!!!!! I could go for something like this even though it would run up my gas bill since I'd have to drive many miles to avoid the urban spew.

  12. <snip> What will the failure for geocaching be? Hard to tell.

     

    It's already started to fail and may be on its last legs as far as quality caches are concerned. Central Texas is now the land of urban spew. Today's two most recent caches are parking lot p&g's. Seems you're more likely to find a magnetic keyholder slapped next to a grease pit behind a Sonic Drive-In than find a cache that will take you on a hike through a wildlife management area!!!!! Based on my observations at the last cache event, it looks like most Central texas cachers could use more "hikers." :D:D:D

     

    BTW, still waiting for that invite so we can tackle some of those Franklin Mountain caches!!!!! :D:unsure::unsure:

    • MAJOR fear of being abducted by a band of beautiful hottie wild Amazon women who would then keep me in their wilderness camp and force me to provide services for them to help keep them happy. Good golly gosh, I would REALLY hate that! Really!

    "Mandrake. Women uh... women sense my power and they seek the life essence. I, uh... I do not avoid women, Mandrake. But I... I do deny them my essence" :D:lol::huh:

    Dr. Zhivago! General Jack Ripper is one of my favorites!

    "Mandrake. Mandrake, have you never wondered why I drink only distilled water....?"

     

    :D:D;):)

     

    :P

     

    I believe it's "Dr Strangelove."

  13. I think that this is two bad pieces of advice.

     

    First, if the other cachers did ask for permission, they may be able to give you good advice on how to get yours approved.

     

    Second, if you get turned down, it would be better to simply notify the other cache owners of what happened. A) It gives them a chance to fix the problem (perhaps they have permission), B ) It doesn't peave a land manager and poison future caching at that location, and C) It doesn't get everyone mad at you because overstepped.

     

    I'm not surprised!!!!!

     

    You shouldn't be. It's the right answer.

     

    Ohhhhhh, so now we've found a caching "absolute!!!!!" I thought it was all about "Shades of Gray." :D:lol::huh:

     

    That said, I disagree with you, but then again that's my perogative!!!!!! ;):P:)

  14. The route would be about 2 hours to drive. 110 miles +/-

     

    Kojones

     

    2 hours without stops, but with fifty stops, your looking at an all day excursion. I'd be an unhappy cacher if I drove 70 miles, made 26 stops, then found out that stage 27 is missing.

     

    From some of the posts, it seems it's all about the numbers, of smilies that is!!!!!!!!! Make it a 50 waypoint multi through the mountains and you'll attract "real" geocachers and not just the "skirt lifters." I'd love to do a 50 waypoint multi along a mountain trek and only score one smilie!!!!!!!!

     

    A trek through the mountains for a real cache would be high on my to do list, not an endless jaunt through the city.

     

    Eagletrek,

     

    You would probably like my 100th cache Operation Wreckhunter

     

    You must be skilled in navigation/route-finding, access to all of the locations is via "cross country" routes.

    Your physical conditioning must be at its peak.

    You'll be visiting several dry areas. You must carry in all of your drinking water.

    You'll make several hikes with a combined hiking distance of over 20 miles. Hiking boots are a must.

    These hikes are in extremely rugged terrain that include extreme elevation gains and losses, scree slopes, and lots of sharp rocks.

    You'll need to drive over 250 miles to visit the different wreck sites.

    You'll drive over 60 miles on dirt roads. A pickup truck is highly recommended.

     

    Now that's what I call a cache!!!!!! It's too bad that we don't have many like that in Central Texas but you have given me an idea for a future cache. I might have to convince a friend of mine that we take a road trip in the future to score this one. I wouldn't mine travelling 2000+ miles just to get this one.

  15. Here's an idea. How about asking the folks that own/manage the property first. I really couldn't give two hoots as to what the "local cachers" say because based on my personal experience most never ask permission before hiding a cache. If you are told "no" about placing a cache, then I see nothing wrong with doing one of two things.

     

    You could inform the park's folks of the current caches in their park and let them take care of them or you could find and retrieve the "unauthorized" caches and place them at a location (with permission) and then inform the owners of where they can find their displaced caches. Either way, you're doing the right thing!!!!!

     

    Yes, yes, I know I didn't mention emailing the owner option!!!!!! Why didn't I?????? Because in most caches it doesn't work!!!!!!

     

    If doing the right thing makes you the local caching pariah, who cares!!!!!!! You can't please all the folks, all the time. You may be surprised that folks with your similar qualities may actually seek you out. There are alot of folks out there who want to do the right thing but who don't have the guts to do it. Too many folks go through life worried about what other folks think of them and they don't do what's right. Don't be one of them.

    I think that this is two bad pieces of advice.

     

    First, if the other cachers did ask for permission, they may be able to give you good advice on how to get yours approved.

     

    Second, if you get turned down, it would be better to simply notify the other cache owners of what happened. A) It gives them a chance to fix the problem (perhaps they have permission), B ) It doesn't peave a land manager and poison future caching at that location, and C) It doesn't get everyone mad at you because overstepped.

     

    I'm not surprised!!!!!

  16. From some of the posts, it seems it's all about the numbers, of smilies that is!!!!!!!!! Make it a 50 waypoint multi through the mountains and you'll attract "real" geocachers and not just the "skirt lifters." I'd love to do a 50 waypoint multi along a mountain trek and only score one smilie!!!!!!!!

  17. Here's an idea. How about asking the folks that own/manage the property first. I really couldn't give two hoots as to what the "local cachers" say because based on my personal experience most never ask permission before hiding a cache. If you are told "no" about placing a cache, then I see nothing wrong with doing one of two things.

     

    You could inform the park's folks of the current caches in their park and let them take care of them or you could find and retrieve the "unauthorized" caches and place them at a location (with permission) and then inform the owners of where they can find their displaced caches. Either way, you're doing the right thing!!!!!

     

    Yes, yes, I know I didn't mention emailing the owner option!!!!!! Why didn't I?????? Because in most cases it doesn't work!!!!!!

     

    If doing the right thing makes you the local caching pariah, who cares!!!!!!! You can't please all the folks, all the time. You may be surprised that folks with your similar qualities may actually seek you out. There are alot of folks out there who want to do the right thing but who don't have the guts to do it. Too many folks go through life worried about what other folks think of them and they don't do what's right. Don't be one of them.

  18. I'm sure someone might find it interesting. It really depends where your multi is going to take them. If they are placed to focus on some great outdoor adventure that would be great but if they're going to take folks to some grease pit behind a Sconic drive-in, I'm sure they wouldn't find it very exciting.

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