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Phonedave

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Everything posted by Phonedave

  1. I am a utility worker (well I am management, but I used to be in the field) Aside from a hard hat, we really do not look any different. Most of the time our guys are up poles or in manholes, not looking under park benches anyway
  2. As a Mason... I wonder how you could pretend to be one of us... do we look different than others? I was thinking the same thing. Is there someplace we are allowed to go, that others are not?
  3. You could ask the same question of Geocaching... Or fishing... Fish can be bought in a market also... Same thing that attracts fishermen to fishing... attracts hunters to hunting... and why does a conservationist have to be hired to cull the numbers when hunting is such a popular soprt, and serves the conservation of resources... BTW... NJ has one of the best, most successful Fish & Game Departments in the US... Sorry... a bit off topic... this really is not the forum to discuss the pros/cons of hunting... Exactly One thing that hunting has done, at least for me, is has given me a GREATER repsect for animal life. Its one thing to go to a store, and buy an nice shiny, sanitary, pre-wrapped, package of meat. You bring it home, cook it, and never give a thought as to where it came from, or what it once was. Its an entirely diffent story when you must do all the work yourself, and you see that meat is a) a living, breathing, animal, and b ) messy. I am well aware of what I am eating, and where it came from, and what was sacrificed evertime I eat meat, weather it came from a sterile grocery store, or from the fields. -dave
  4. There is no rifle hunting in NJ. It's all shotgun and bow. You can use a rifled slug gun (shotgun) but not a regular rifle. -dave NJDEP Rifle Permit A valid rifle permit is required for coyote, deer, squirrel and woodchuck hunting with a muzzleloading rifle; raccoon and opossum hunting with a .22 caliber rifle; and for dispatching trapped animals other than muskrat with a .22 caliber rifle. Initial rifle permit applicants must be at least 10 years old and have successfully completed a rifle Hunter Education course. Rifle permits for 10 to 17 years olds will be valid only for muzzleloaders. No persons under 18 years old may hunt with centerfire or rimfire rifles. Are we talking deer or small game in this thread. I hope that any hunter who has passed the hunter education course in NJ would not mistake a human for small game (same goes for any other animal as well, but I digress) .22 rifle is only for racoon and opossum - (Which is in season shortly BTW) The rifle mentioned below for deer are muzzeloaders only - .44 + Much like the rationale mentioned that "bow hunters are safer because they need to pick their shots because they only get one" (which I don't wholly agree with) a muzzeloader only gets one. In reality, a safe and legal hunter will cary any weapon in a safe condition, will identify his or her target, will identify what is BEYOND their target, and will only fire if the entire shot picture is safe. Now I am not going to claim that every hunter that is out there is perfect, but the vast, vast, majority of them are. And those of us who are tend to "police ourselves" Those that are safe will correct those that are not. I tend to get a little edgy when people start protraying hunters as people whos' only goal is to go into the woods and blast away at everything in sight (not that you said that, but this thread seemed to be heading in that direction). Some of my best days hunting have been days where I never fired a single shot, but it's not the same as a hike, there are differences. Its hard to explain, but it's different. Anyway, this is just my two cents. If everyone takes proper percautions everybody should get along just fine. And if ANYBODY sees ANYBODY hunting where they should not be, my advice is mark the waypoint and leave, and then call the rangers in the area and tell them what and where you saw it. The Rangers in NJ take their job VERY seriously and have no sympathy for people who skirt the law. -dave Well put... Actually, I've been hunting in NJ since the late '60's... and the only time I felt unsafe was in Wittingham WMA... on opening day for pheasant... It was back in the 70's and a bunch of obviously "city boys" were running (litterally) and taking shots at anything that moved... while they were running... We left and went elsewhere... I still advise wearing hunter orange while geocaching... It's probably more likely you can get hit during small game season than deer season... as in small game (at least birds) you are trying to hit a moving target... and the someone may not see you walk around the end or over the top of a burm... And do not underestimate what a blast of high brass #6 birdshot will do to a geocacher... Best to aviod caches in WMA's during hunting season... I have been avoiding placing caches in Flatbrook-Roy WMA for just that very reason. Thats where we hunt phesant. During the off season its a nice place to go and cache - I would love to place some around the beaver pond area. Also some of the abandoned houses and wells from the old Tocks Island project would be interesting places to bring a cacher. But during upland game season I would be leery. I don't think anybody would be shot, but it might unnerve a few. I know what you mean about "city types". We call them "meat hunters" They are they ones who will be staking out birds roosting in trees along the road. Then at sunup, they bag them and go home. It more enjoyable to buy a chicken at the grocery store if thats what you are going to do. I have also seen some people do some stupid things hunting. But you tend to see the same core of people year over year, and the unsafe ones tend to get weeded out. They are the ones who think its all running through the wood blowing stuff away. They soon find out its not, and never come back. -dave
  5. There is no rifle hunting in NJ. It's all shotgun and bow. You can use a rifled slug gun (shotgun) but not a regular rifle. -dave NJDEP Rifle Permit A valid rifle permit is required for coyote, deer, squirrel and woodchuck hunting with a muzzleloading rifle; raccoon and opossum hunting with a .22 caliber rifle; and for dispatching trapped animals other than muskrat with a .22 caliber rifle. Initial rifle permit applicants must be at least 10 years old and have successfully completed a rifle Hunter Education course. Rifle permits for 10 to 17 years olds will be valid only for muzzleloaders. No persons under 18 years old may hunt with centerfire or rimfire rifles. Are we talking deer or small game in this thread. I hope that any hunter who has passed the hunter education course in NJ would not mistake a human for small game (same goes for any other animal as well, but I digress) .22 rifle is only for racoon and opossum - (Which is in season shortly BTW) The rifle mentioned below for deer are muzzeloaders only - .44 + Much like the rationale mentioned that "bow hunters are safer because they need to pick their shots because they only get one" (which I don't wholly agree with) a muzzeloader only gets one. In reality, a safe and legal hunter will cary any weapon in a safe condition, will identify his or her target, will identify what is BEYOND their target, and will only fire if the entire shot picture is safe. Now I am not going to claim that every hunter that is out there is perfect, but the vast, vast, majority of them are. And those of us who are tend to "police ourselves" Those that are safe will correct those that are not. I tend to get a little edgy when people start protraying hunters as people whos' only goal is to go into the woods and blast away at everything in sight (not that you said that, but this thread seemed to be heading in that direction). Some of my best days hunting have been days where I never fired a single shot, but it's not the same as a hike, there are differences. Its hard to explain, but it's different. Anyway, this is just my two cents. If everyone takes proper percautions everybody should get along just fine. And if ANYBODY sees ANYBODY hunting where they should not be, my advice is mark the waypoint and leave, and then call the rangers in the area and tell them what and where you saw it. The Rangers in NJ take their job VERY seriously and have no sympathy for people who skirt the law. -dave
  6. There is no rifle hunting in NJ. It's all shotgun and bow. You can use a rifled slug gun (shotgun) but not a regular rifle. -dave
  7. It can be multiple rashes. My 3 year old is just finishing up a 21 day cycle of Amox for Lyme. She had bullseye rashes on her legs, rear, and trunk - About 6 or 7 spots. She also complained that she was tired and her knees hurt. My wife took her to the doc, and he said "its just an allergic reaction" and prescribed Benedryl. My wife went back 3 days later armed with documentation from the internet and pictures. Another doctor in the practice took one look at her and said "thats Lyme" and started the antibiotics - the rash and other symptoms cleared the next day. A blood test confirmed Lyme. We may have to look for a new doctor. I do a tick check on the kids when I take them out, and use DEET on them. I saw no evidence of any ticks on her. Best guess based on the rough time frame, is she picked it up while we were caching on Garret Mountain. -dave
  8. # 2634 Made it to Iraq and back. I was lucky enough to have it pass through my hands. It did give me pause to stop and think. 13,663 miles, and it seems to have stalled in October of 2004 YJTB #2634 -dave
  9. I hear the "Bada Bing" is pretty good too! My brother in law used to bounce there.
  10. And thanks to Johnboy for leading us around as easily as I find my way around my backyard. (even though he forgets where he placed his own caches). -dave
  11. Congrats. Glad I was there to see you do it !. -dave
  12. Kind of like an upscale White Castle. Once you go in there, your clothes smell like White Manna for the rest of the day. I'm been there a couple times and always walked away happy. As for a place to have an event, unless you are the 6 or 8 people that could fit (squeeze) up to the counter, you'll be standing outside in the parking lot. Been there done that. BTW, this is the greatest place on the planet. Thus this it the best virtual ever. EVER! If was geocaching back then when this virtual was active, it would have been in the bag. I can't count the number of times I have eaten there. Or the number of take out orders I have brought home (they freeze pretty well too - not quite the same, but still dadgum good) -dave
  13. Callahan's - All over the place, but the one in Fort Lee is nice and large Galloping Hill - Good dogs (and other food) indoor seating, but not conducive to a meeting. Outdoor seating at round "paito type" tables. 4 or 5 can sit and talk. Hirams - Right across from Callahans in Fort Lee. Again - good dogs. Table seating. A small group could meet there. Hot Dog Johnny's - Great place. Ourdoorsy seating, so a group could meet there Rutt's Hut - RIPPERS - And they call it relish, but its not. It is it's own food group. Ample tables for meeting. I used to have my office in Clifton for a while. I think thats when I got this gut White Manna - Meeting - Ha hahahahahahaha. Your lucky if you can fit yourself into this place, let along a group. Having said that, I drool every time I pass this place (and I only live about 2 miles away) White Rose System - In addition to the one listed on this site, there is also one in Linden (I had an office in Linden for a while also). I don't know if they are related, but the Cali burgers in each taste the same - dang tasty. Not really a meeting place for more than 4 or 5 people (diner like seating) Thats about all for me - and my stomach -dave
  14. Since Avroair and Mrs Avroair will be staying at Bear Mtn the evening before, we are in! Can you post parking tudes. Just telling me Route 9 means nothing as Dave can attest! OK. Now you have convinced me. 1) I have been caching for almost a year and have yet to meet any others, so why not start now and more oddly 2) I too will be attending a wedding on the 14th (in North Jersey), so why not - it can be a post wedding thing So count me in. Cleared it with family command, all set to go -dave
  15. Well Time will not dim is right outside the stadium - it is a virtual cache though. I thought Top of the Hillwas a nice cache. Especialy if you approach from the Inner Harbor and go up the face of the hill - that was cool. If you search on those two, you will see there are a bunch of caches around the Inner Harbor and surrounding areas. Some micros, some virts, and just outside the area (not really walking distance, but a 10 min drive) are some standard ones. -dave
  16. Gets better all the time. Sure does "Scollon was angry about the comments from the Game Commission. ''If I was an inexperienced camper I wouldn't be alive right now,'' he said Wednesday. ''If [Feeney] was inexperienced, she wouldn't be alive right now.''" If he was so experienced, whats he doing running, yelling play dead, and leaving food out? I have encountered one bear. We were phesant hunting in the Flatbrook-Roy WMA in NJ. My father and I crested a hill, and there was a bear, up a tree. We backed away slowly, and let my brother know to keep the dog off the hill. When we got to the bottom, we ran into an other group of phesant hunters. We warned them about the bear, and they decided to go look - I guess they were "experienced" as well. -dave
  17. Are you comming over the GWB or throught the tunnel? If you are comming over the GWB, then you can hit either Chief Oratam's T.B. Hotel & Signature Item Cache and/or Overpeck Park - Henry Hoebel Area Parking for the first one is 5 minutes off Route 80 before you even get to the Turnpike, and it about 15 minutes round trip to get the cache. The second is a multi - but you can drive, again in 5 minutes, to the first stage, and then its a 5 minute walk to the second stage. Again it's right off of Route 80 (in fact its the same exit, just the other direction on the local road as the first one) The first one is a Tupperware container, the second is an Ammo Can. - Should hold TB's nicely. -dave What Phonedave said.....thanks for the plug Yes, I think my Now How Do I Get Out ?is closer to the exit, but seeing as it involves a 2 mile R/T walk through tick land, I opted to give the plug to you. -dave
  18. Are you comming over the GWB or throught the tunnel? If you are comming over the GWB, then you can hit either Chief Oratam's T.B. Hotel & Signature Item Cache and/or Overpeck Park - Henry Hoebel Area Parking for the first one is 5 minutes off Route 80 before you even get to the Turnpike, and it about 15 minutes round trip to get the cache. The second is a multi - but you can drive, again in 5 minutes, to the first stage, and then its a 5 minute walk to the second stage. Again it's right off of Route 80 (in fact its the same exit, just the other direction on the local road as the first one) The first one is a Tupperware container, the second is an Ammo Can. - Should hold TB's nicely. -dave
  19. Me personaly, I would not mind. It's everybodys wilderness and your free to use it as well. It would be nice if you did not go crashing about, but I am not going to get mad at you about it. Others however ...... Turkey hunters are, for the most part, going to be camoed up and in place well before you are in the woods. You want to be in place as the birds come down from their overnight roosts and begin moving, either to feed or to mate. Unless you are out quite early, you should not be bothering people during this time. Turkey hunting is different from deer hunting in that you cannot stalk turkeys. In fact, if you happend to kick one up and chase it towards my spot, it would be illegal for me to shoot it. and if I did and was caught, both you are I would be explaining to the game warden that we are not in cahoots together. Turkeys must be called in by the hunter. I would be more worried about have the daylights scared out of me as you are standing somwhere and a voice from a camoed hunter you did not see comes from 5 feet away. -dave
  20. I got it! They were mutated in the late 90's due to the local refineries and power plants in the waters nearby. They have had enough of the torturous local bird watchers pointing and laughing at them. They no longer wish to be exploited for their differences and wish to fly away to distant shores in hopes of finding some place of acceptance! Now THAT I will accept. Anyway, I still like it. Anything to promote the "tickfest marsh" area in which I live -dave
  21. I like it. Just one question? What birds are those supposed to be? They look more like Flamingos than Canada Geese to me (check the feet). Either way, I'll take a bunch. Phragmites - has anybody from outside the Meadowlands even head of them? Cool -dave
  22. Flat (or semi-flat) for me under .5 (one way) is a walk, up to lets say 3 to 3.5 miles each way is a "hike" beyond that is a "significant hike" Throw in some elevation changes or rock scrambles and that changes things. Take Do or do not there is no try on the NJ Palisades as an example. If you hike from the Alpine Boat Basin to the cache and back along the shore trail, about 7+ round trip miles I think, to me thats just a hike. Its all pretty flat except the last .2 to the cache. However, if you come down from from Stateline on the Blue/White, and head out over the Giant Stairs and up the Peanut Cascade and loop back, thats a significant hike. Its only about a 5.5 mile loop but down the blue/white is a -500 ft (+/-) change in elevation to the cache, and then back up the Peanut Cascade and the Giant Stairs themselves are a roughly 2 mile rock scramble. -dave
  23. Outdoors Lady hit 400 on my Achkinkeshacky (GCM9HJ) cache Sunday. I am honored Congrats. -dave
  24. Its not really the fall onto a surface that hurts. It the forearms, insides of your thighs, and quite possibly your face getting loaded with creasoe laden splinters as you grab the pole because either A) Your still belted in, or B.) You don't feel like breaking your legs. -dave
  25. Buckets (and ladders) are more and more common, however people still do hook (or gaff) poles. When I was a Foreman, my car was a hatchback, so every inspection I did was on hooks. You would be suprised what can cause you to cut out. Hitting a tack head just right can do it, Plus when people do things like put rigid signs on poles, those are a mess to climb around. Lastly, if a pole has to be removed because of an accident, it gets cut. Just like a lumberjack encountering a nail in a tree, extra hardware in a pole is not pleasant. -dave
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