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Mike & Jess

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Posts posted by Mike & Jess

  1. I'm trying to put together a list for the wife, as she (and my parents) have asked for one every year.

    Trying to stay away from the expensive wants, I'm having a hard time putting something together.

     

    So... What backpacking, outdoors stuff is on your wishlist this year?

     

    Not much material oriented stuff... I got junk all over the place.

     

    I would wish for a like minded person to do things with however. Similar abilities and interests, slight preference for female of course, but anyone would do. My room mate likes to 'cheer' but from the bleachers or more civilized areas.

    This year was very restricted for me since almost no one wants to walk or bike anywhere, or even drive for that matter... just sit and complain there isn't anything to do most of the time. Younger people like to go with their friends, old folk (remember I'm 63+) might but often can't. Add the fact that there are not that many to start with and it's hard, or I risk it and go alone, often paying a small physical price to do so, since I then get it in the ears for soloing. Add that this area has a limited number of caches most are found already, and you can see what I mean. Sigh!

     

    Doug 7rxc

    giving thanks for interesting forum topics and out of area puzzles to solve.

    Being about half your age (sorry had too), I have similar issues of finding someone to go out hiking, biking, kayaking. My wife is not even remotely able to do the types of trips I like to do, and regardless, the quit time is nice. I'm going to try taking my (will be next spring) 4yrs old with me. Although he is small, he's more then capable of carrying his own weight and go the long haul. Unfortunately he can't do the mtn biking yet.

     

    Back on topic... Without getting into major equipment (tents, new kayaks, etc), the only thing on my list would be probably a new backpacking stove. I'm currently using coleman bunson burner stove, but don't like using the canisters as you never know how long one will last, so always have to carry 2 canisters.

     

    My other gear slated to be replaced;

    - hiking sleeping bag with warmer one (see cold weather sleeping bag thread)

    - Crappy weather tent (4 person tent is too big and heavy) Already planning on purchasing a hammack tent. Thinking the two person one as although I won't be sharing the space with anyone, the extra room would be nice.

     

    I'm not much of a gift person at Christmas. A box of chocolates, turkey and drinks with the family is good enough for me. The wife and family always hound me for a list, so I thought I would give in this year and save them from getting me expensive stuff I don't need or will not use.

  2. I'm trying to put together a list for the wife, as she (and my parents) have asked for one every year.

    Trying to stay away from the expensive wants, I'm having a hard time putting something together.

     

    So... What backpacking, outdoors stuff is on your wishlist this year?

  3. 9 volt battery and a ball of steel wool. Just make SURE you keep the battery in a separate pocket of your pack!

    I don't no about yourself, but I don't normally carry steel wool in my pocket.

     

    That being said, I don't think I carry anything that uses a 9V battery either. If I had steel wool... I could rig something up with the extra AA batteries I would have on me.

  4. All this also fails the basic DIY criteria as well, but I'm not nit picking here... since it doesn't mention initial ignition sources and techniques either, so who is counting. It's all useful information.

     

    After iginition takes place, BBark is good if you have it available as stated several times, and usually indicates the presence of Birch wood which also burns quite well for initial fuel loading to warm up bigger fuels.

     

    Still trying to ignite some petroleum jelly, stuff I have seems to extinguish flames... cheap brand...

     

    Doug 7rxc

    You're right. I didn't see the part of the description that says "or in a jam in the field" In which case most of what I said wouldn't be of much use. It's worth mentioning to learn how to use a bow/drill to make fire. It's not reliable and take a lot of work but it could save your life one day.

    I never tried or learned how to do this. I can't say I have ever personally witnessed anyone be successful with it either.

  5. It is a very good idea and I mostly use internet to find a cheap equipment for hiking and climbing. One of my friend always use second-hand tents and many other things. I think it is also a cheap way.

    I mostly use budget or used gear, but after getting caught twice freezing my butt off with my $30 hiking bag... no more.

     

    This project started as a low budget, but the product I found to use has raised the price (and the quality). If it all works out as expected, my sons' sleeping bags will be cheap to make. My oldest will be 4 next spring, and he is planning on going with daddy on some of my multi-day backpacking trips. Hard to find good used gear that will fit a 4yrs old or that he can carry himself.

  6. Yesterdays rain was replaced by todays dusting of snow, now starting to melt away... earliest on the ground here I've seen, the previous was on 2006/10/29 when we moved in. Nothing at 0600, about 8 inches when we had to return the truck at 1000. Then it melted away until December. Not like that today though, but more is forecast. Glad I went out on Thursday for the high country cache trail.

     

    Doug 7rxc

    Should be prime time to practise those fire starting skills

     

    I need to find some time to get out and do some practising on the old skills. Didn't even have time to practise on the fire I had going for the parents and kids to warm up at Halloween night. Had to cheat with news papers and kindling (old shelf from the garage) as the kids where revved up to go get candy.

    Been wet here all week thanks to the storm south of here, so I'll try and sneak out to practise first thing Saturday morning before everyone else wakes up.

  7. I got the thermal reflective sample in the mail two days ago. This stuff is better than I had expected.

    It's about as thick as heavier weight paper (not as thick as card stock), very tear resistant (wife tried to rip it) and as flexible as normal material. It's also perforated so it does breath.

    With everything else already picked out (local fabric store), all I need to do is find the shell material (fabric). Will probably go with a 28-30" zipper. The bag will be a mommy style, with hood. I have a couple other small items in the design which will add to it if I get caught in the really cold weather.

     

    snip%<

     

    So what is the trade name for this material? I spent a few minutes looking and came up with all sorts of things, but not anything perforated, so far. Soon I'll have more time.

     

    Snow gave way to rain today so the woods is getting wet again. More experimenting with fire too! TDMs Tinder Quik offering looks promising for commercial product. Fills the spark requirement, and is claimed to burn effectively. Thought about those 'cupcake' starters using BB, Cardboard and Wax.. with a cotton ball/dryer lint starter bit. Ooops wrong thread, oh well. Back to sleeping sacks... having enough room, while keeping weight and bulk under control, for extra layers of clothing is fair and a good technique. I was out once and found it really adviseable to add my duvet jacket, down booties and some other wool clothing on my butt and legs... that was about -45 C. No wind to speak of thank heaven. ONR got the train thawed enough to pick us up but many hours late... Took two days to get to Toronto from where we were, a normal 3 hour jaunt... Not far from you actually. half way from Temagami to North Bay. Neat experience, but could have been desperate after a while.

     

    Doug 7rxc

    This project won't be to acheive -45'C grading. If I was to reach that point on this project, I've failed as it would be more bulk and weight then I would need. I would also cook in spring/fall temperatures which is what I am designing for. -45'C might be another project down the line. I've aquired so much information on different products that a -45'C bag would be easy to accomplish, and stay lighter weight then my WW2 era millitary winter bag (which would break my bag trying to backpack that bag).

    The hardest thing with this project is keeping the material cost down. The products and technology is easily available, but will cost. I'm not making a $300+ backpack bag (not this time anyway).

  8. I got the thermal reflective sample in the mail two days ago. This stuff is better than I had expected.

    It's about as thick as heavier weight paper (not as thick as card stock), very tear resistant (wife tried to rip it) and as flexible as normal material. It's also perforated so it does breath.

    With everything else already picked out (local fabric store), all I need to do is find the shell material (fabric). Will probably go with a 28-30" zipper. The bag will be a mommy style, with hood. I have a couple other small items in the design which will add to it if I get caught in the really cold weather.

     

    Down side, budget will be more then I hoped (really decent though at about $100). The up side, I'm now looking sub 0'C with NO MAT.

     

    Side note:

    Sleeping bag temp ratings are based on the assumption you are using a mat (R rating I can't remember), and the bag sized perfectly.

    ...and long johns for the lower end of the temp scale.

    As per REI, there are no real guidelines in the US for temp rating of sleeping bags, the Europe rating system assumes a sleeper wearing one synthetic baselayer (top and bottom) and a hat, and using a closed-cell foam sleeping pad.

  9. I've heard good things about the blast match. We see so many match containers why not use matches or the good old BIC lighter? Or even a fresnal lens? NEVER rely on a ZIPPO because the fuel WILL evaporate, or leak out and make a mess of your pack. Now for tinder-gauze and other materials from a first aid kit. You're outdoors you should have hand sanitizer. Mix that with the gauze or cotton balls. Could also use vaseline. Use Hexamine tablets(fuel tabs for camp/survival stoves) If nothing you can burn them by themselves. I have tinder quick( see HERE) But have never used them or know anyone who has.

    That TinderQuik claims to be lightable with flint/steel (they sell a device for that purpose) so it seems to fit on the requirements I have... that of not having matches etc. (not that I would of course).

     

    As for limits on many sources of ignition... lighter fuel does tend to evaporate (why you check it and carry spare), Butane doesn't like to evaporate at all in really cold weather, these days strike anywhere matches seem not to strike anywhere very well, the hexamine / esbit type fuel pellets seem to be rare locally. I haven't found a local source yet, and I don't know if they will light from a spark either... but they do make useful fuel source initially. All this also fails the basic DIY criteria as well, but I'm not nit picking here... since it doesn't mention initial ignition sources and techniques either, so who is counting. It's all useful information.

     

    After iginition takes place, BBark is good if you have it available as stated several times, and usually indicates the presence of Birch wood which also burns quite well for initial fuel loading to warm up bigger fuels.

     

    Still trying to ignite some petroleum jelly, stuff I have seems to extinguish flames... cheap brand...

     

    Doug 7rxc

    I don't think petroleum jelly really is petroleum or much of it these days.

     

    Birch barn has always been the first item to search for when starting a fire in my area. If you can combined that with cedar bark, you should have a decent coal base by the time the birch has burned off. I've actually boiled water off birch and cedar bark before the fire was truely going (cold morning, and we wanted coffee asap).

    I've also been in areas or situations where birch and cedar where impossible to locate. In one case, I had to rely on pine needles/dead ferns and drift wood shavings.

     

    As for lighting... BIC (name brand) lighters all the way. I do always carry strike anywhere (with a striker) in a waterproof package, but normally have 2 BIC lighters handy.

  10. I got the thermal reflective sample in the mail two days ago. This stuff is better than I had expected.

    It's about as thick as heavier weight paper (not as thick as card stock), very tear resistant (wife tried to rip it) and as flexible as normal material. It's also perforated so it does breath.

    With everything else already picked out (local fabric store), all I need to do is find the shell material (fabric). Will probably go with a 28-30" zipper. The bag will be a mommy style, with hood. I have a couple other small items in the design which will add to it if I get caught in the really cold weather.

     

    Down side, budget will be more then I hoped (really decent though at about $100). The up side, I'm now looking sub 0'C with NO MAT.

     

    Side note:

    Sleeping bag temp ratings are based on the assumption you are using a mat (R rating I can't remember), and the bag sized perfectly.

  11. Well... The low cost might be out the window a bit, but near or below zero is looking possible (below 0'C or 30'F).

     

    I found a fabric made by a company in Texas that although it'll add ~4.8oz to the weight of the bag, it is an R12 rated, thermal refective, breathable machine able fabric. Not cheap though.

    I have the inner liner and outer shell already picked out, the only thing left to nail down is the zipper.

     

    With a mummy bag configuration, would it be too much of a PITA if the zipper was not full length?

    I am thinking of going a zipper about 3ft long to cut cost, weight and air leaks.

  12. That does help – thanks! The only issue I have is that on the website all teh photos are too small to reproduce in print. If some has an original shot that hasn't been reduced in size that would be ideal.

    Email one of the people that uploaded the photos or the TB owner.

  13. I just wanted to know if there were a way to make a popular geocache. I hid one and it is my favorite out of the two that I have hidden but it never seems to be found. Maybe every 3 days, whereas my other cache gets found almost every day. I just wanted to know if there were a way to make a nice popular cache. Thanks for the help!

     

    I don't think we have any caches here locally that can see a find at minimum every 3 days.

     

    As others have mentioned, quality finds are better finds. Frequency isn't everything. It just means it's feeding the quick park & grab crowd.

  14. This is one reason why I feel GS should remove the delete log option away from the cache owners. I see more CO abuse their power than cachers.

     

    I agree with this. If a log is bad enough to need to be deleted, it should require a reviewer to do it.

     

    We have a local cacher now heavy with the delete key. NM, NA or anything short of praise, its gone.

     

    If I have an issue with a log, I'll ask (nicely) the cacher that logged it to adjust their log (major spoiler or similar).

  15. I'd like the RAM mount to attach my Oregon to my mountain bike handlebar. It goes for $20-25 so I will likely put that on my list.

     

    Waterproof hiking boots would be a great gift for me.

     

    Also, how about one of those astronaut pens that write upside down, in the cold, etc?

    I have the garmin mount right on the stem of my mtn bike. Works great and keeps the GPS a bit lower profile and reasonably safe if I crash. Worth every penny/

     

    There is only one thing I want and money can't buy it: a moun10bike geocoin.

    Are you talking about these?

    bike_back144.jpg

     

    Love that coin!

     

    Although cool, that's not it but if you have any left, how much and is it trackable?

    Trackable yes, as for if I have any left and how much... I need to look. Technically we are sold out, but I might still have a few stashed away of my wife didn't find them in my office.

  16. 'Collectable-bility' has nothing to do with the ability to log.

     

    It is status in YOUR collection or inventory that determines what logs may/may not be filed. This is completely different than being "collectable" or "not collectable".

     

    If a trackable is in your inventory ANY log can be filed....

    If a trackable is in your collection ONLY "Discover" or "Note" logs can be filed (including by you, the owner).

     

    Collectable or Not Collectable has to do with whether the trackable is/is not up for KEEPING.

     

     

    These terms have been confusing for many from the onset. It would be good to have them changed.

    What you are saying makes sense, but then what is the Collectable checkbox for under the edit TB page?

    If I hadn't seen that, I would have assumed the "move to inventory" was the way.

  17. I did not know this until my wife pointed it out last night during our drive home.

    If you go to the Geocaching.com on your phone (GPS enabled), thre is a link near the bottom left which allows you to "Find My Location" and search geocaches near you.

     

    Are there any other features that are available via moble phone besides this neat feature?

  18. I'm not sure if I'm the only one that noticed this, or if I am late to knowing this.

     

    My SRT4 vehicle trackable was not collectable when I registered it, and sometime since, has become so. I've had to steal it back from other cachers who have retreived it from me (virtually).

    When I checked the trackable page, the option to be collectable was not checked off.

     

    Was this a known bug previously discussed?

  19. I'd like the RAM mount to attach my Oregon to my mountain bike handlebar. It goes for $20-25 so I will likely put that on my list.

     

    Waterproof hiking boots would be a great gift for me.

     

    Also, how about one of those astronaut pens that write upside down, in the cold, etc?

    I have the garmin mount right on the stem of my mtn bike. Works great and keeps the GPS a bit lower profile and reasonably safe if I crash. Worth every penny/

     

    There is only one thing I want and money can't buy it: a moun10bike geocoin.

    Are you talking about these?

    bike_back144.jpg

     

    Love that coin!

    Not to go too off topic, buy my wife's shop is now sold out of them. I might however have one or two hidden in the back of my home office in case needed.

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