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Chipper3

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Everything posted by Chipper3

  1. I am a fairly "green minded" person but I don't obsess over the finer points of living on this planet. I do stay on the paths in alpine meadows but have no qualms about getting off of the trail in state parks and going cross country, Having said that, I am amazed at how quickly a trail develops to geocache sites. I recently logged some way off road caches and maybe 6-8 people in the last year had logged the cache. But that was enough traffic to create a path void of vegetation. I am intereseted in how the "community" feels about this and how should we be responsible to the environment while enjoying our hobby.
  2. In the context of geocaching, triangulate means to identify the location of a WP by: 1. Go to a location say 100 feet from target. Obtain a bearing to target from your GPS. Use your compass and site along that bearing and create a "line." I have seen this doen with string but you are looking for a visible reference like a big tree or rock. 2. Repeat from a 2nd point about 120 degrees from the 1st. 3. Repeat from a 3rd point about 240 degrees from the 1st. Where lines all intersect will be the target. Triangulation was used a lot to pin point the location of hidden radio transmitters. Instead of a GPS, a highly directional antenna was used to establish a bearing. where the lines crossed was where teh 'spy" was located.
  3. Here is a copy of my post to a similar question. Zero in on the aprts about COMPASS and TRACK and BEARING.. ------- 1. Arm yourself with every "tool" available. That is part of good orienting. In addition to that Mapquest map,which gets you by car to some starting spot, start using a topo/arial map as well. A good one is lostinthewoods. With expereince, you will start dropping off tools but they really help you "put it all together." Its like in school, you need the answers to the algebra problems to understand if you are making the right calculations. 2. After all is said and done , you need a GPS that allows you to enter a WP and a compass. "Tell" the GPS to GO TO and pull up a what I call the rosette screen. Most GPS units have this. This screen is like looking at a compass with you in the center and the direction you are travelling will be UP and the direction you need to GO will be indicated. 3. Get very familiar with TRACK and BEARING. Track is the compass heading that you are "walking" and BEARING is the compass heading that you "need to walk." Thes numbers need to be on the display screen you select 4. You will notice that the GPS gives you great info when you are in the car moving or biking or walking briskly but when you stop, it doesn't know your TRACK anymore but still knows your BEARING. Thats why you need that compass. When I get close to the cache, DISTANCE less than .05 - 250 feet, I start to stop a lot. Get your BEARING from the GPS and use your compass to give you that BEARING and walk in that direction. This is also great for triangulating to locate a cache when the GPS starts to jumparound because of tree cover. 4. When you are at DISTANCE 0 or at the intersection of triangulation lines, then your compass and GPS are useless. Do not get sucked in to thinking that just becasue your GPS sez you are there that you are there. You will have error in your unit and the unit used to place the cache will have error and this can throw you off a good bit. So, at this point, you will have put your technology in the bag and start doing the GEO-Dance and using a lot of common sense and intuition. 5. As for "flying" with the GPS alone. This can be fun but you need to practice going to known locations. I usually use the 90 degree rule. I drive until target is 90 degree to the road I am on and then turn appropriately. If you want to "stay pure" you really do need a map as you may be trucking down a road that deadends into a lake and then you have to back track a zillion miles. It is one thing to use a map INSTEAD of the GPS and another to use a map WITH a GPS. INSTEAD of means that the target location is marked on the map. WITH means that the target is not marked on the map. If you are FLYING without the target marked on the map, then your navigator can use the map to pick the next logical road. I like to FLY to caches sometimes. So, 1.) start somewhere and get a bearing and draw a line on the map from where you are along a bearing indicated by the GPS after you GO TO. 2.) Pick a road that advances your game and get going. 3.) Adjust when appropriate. Of course, it's also fun to project the line and also use the DISTANCE to mark the target. Do this from a different starting point and you are bascially traingulating to the target. The fun of learning to orienteer is using many diverse techniques to get to the objective. But you will be frustrated at the beginning if you make it too hard for yourself. Only by using a few simple tools and some maps and knowlege of the answer will you gain the expereince and knowlege to master your craft. Good luck!
  4. Yep! You have to do some averaging. I also triangulate. Now imagine that the other person is "off" When you get close, you have to put the technology in the bag and use common sense and your intuition.
  5. quote:Originally posted by Chipper3:OK, I can help you. Lets start off very simple and let you build your skills. First, pull up EDIT your cache page and before the long description entry window you will see a check box for HTML used...check this ON. Now , on the first line in that field insert the following line <body bgcolor="#FF9900"> For some reason the rest of this post has been truncated. Too bad - lots of good stuff.
  6. OK, I can help you. Lets start off very simple and let you build your skills. First, pull up EDIT your cache page and before the long description entry window you will see a check box for HTML used...check this ON. Now , on the first line in that field insert the following line <body bgcolor="#FF9900">
  7. Here is some code: <p><strong><font color="#FF0000">Og's Outfit</font></strong></p> <p> </p> <p><strong><font color="#FF0000">Og's Outfit</font></strong></p>
  8. waht techniques have you adopted?
  9. 1. Arm yourself with every "tool" available. That is part of good orienting. In addition to that Mapquest map,which gets you by car to some starting spot, start using a topo/arial map as well. A good one is lostinthewoods. With expereince, you will start dropping off tools but they really help you "put it all together." Its like in school, you need the answers to the algebra problems to understand if you are making the right calculations. 2. After all is said and done , you need a GPS that allows you to enter a WP and a compass. "Tell" the GPS to GO TO and pull up a what I call the rosette screen. Most GPS units have this. This screen is like looking at a compass with you in the center and the direction you are travelling will be UP and the direction you need to GO will be indicated. 3. Get very familiar with TRACK and BEARING. Track is the compass heading that you are "walking" and BEARING is the compass heading that you "need to walk." 4. You will notice that the GPS gives you great info when you are in the car moving or biking or walking briskly but when you stop, it doesn't know your TRACK anymore but still knows your BEARING. Thats why you need that compass. When I get close to the cache, DISTANCE less than .05 - 250 feet, I start to stop a lot. Get your BEARING from the GPS and use your compass to give you that BEARING and walk in that direction. This is also great for triangulating to locate a cache when the GPS starts to jumparound because of tree cover. 4. When you are at DISTANCE 0 or at the intersection of triangulation lines, then your compass and GPS are useless. Do not get sucked in to thinking that just becasue your GPS sez you are there that you are there. You will have error in your unit and the unit used to place the cache will have error and this can throw you off a good bit. So, at this point, you will have put your technology in the bag and start doing the GEO-Dance and using a lot of common sense and intuition. 5. As for "flying" with the GPS alone. This can be fun but you need to practice going to known locations. I usually use the 90 degree rule. I drive until target is 90 degree to the road I am on and then turn appropriately. If you want to "stay pure" you really do need a map as you may be trucking down a road that deadends into a lake and then you have to back track a zillion miles. It is one thing to use a map INSTEAD of the GPS and another to use a map WITH a GPS. INSTEAD of means that the target location is marked on the map. WITH means that the target is not marked on the map. If you are FLYING without the target marked on the map, then your navigator can use the map to pick the next logical road. I like to FLY to caches sometimes. So, 1.) start somewhere and get a bearing and draw a line on the map from where you are along a bearing indicated by the GPS after you GO TO. 2.) Pick a road that advances your game and get going. 3.) Adjust when appropriate. Of course, it's also fun to project the line and also use the DISTANCE to mark the target. Do this from a different starting point and you are bascially traingulating to the target. The fun of learning to orienteer is using many diverse techniques to get to the objective. But you will be frustrated at the beginning if you make it too hard for yourself. Only by using a few simple tools and some maps and knowlege of the answer will you gain the expereince and knowlege to master your craft. Good luck!
  10. It may not be in the kit, but ALWAYS enter the woods AFTER puching in the WP of the "parking lot" or trailhead.
  11. It's like with everything else...I think you pay for the extras...the core technology is normally the same. I was going to buy a unit will all the bells and whistles because I like toys, etc. But after doing this for several months: 1. I usually just enter the WP's for the caches I am going to hit on the upcoming weekend therefore I don't need huge storage needs. 2. I go to the field with a "driving" map, a topo map and maybe an arial map, a simple GPS and a COMPASS. 3. The published WP is probably going to be off and your unit is going to be off so you are going to get close and then you are going to have to do the "geo-dance" and use common sense regardless of how expensive a unit you have. 4. You will enjoy the sport more if you are not fiddling with your technology. 5. I would probably spend my money now on a PDA so I could store lots of waypoints for potential use and back off of my spending $$$ on the GPS. 6. Look, this is not a moon-shot. You are going to get close with maps and common sense and hints and your GPS. The teh technology you are going to use is your brains. If I had ONE option it would be to have teh compass as part of the unit. I would opt for that feature before I would opt for color maps etc. 7. You can go a long way and be very successful at geocaching with a GEKO, a compass, Mapquest and Lost-in-the-Woods. Make sure that you know how to use TRACK and BEARING on your GPS and how to use your COMPASS and you will be succesful. 8. Loading WPS by hand is a pain so I also would want that feature if you are going to load lots of WP's for your outings.
  12. Put Ivy Off in your "bag." Summertime bushwhacking always seems to invlove poison ivy.
  13. OK, I placed a TB at a new location and logged the cache site and made comments on the cache site just fine. The TB also shows up in the system as being in the new cache. Now I would like to go to the TB page and enter a comment there, etc. I see how to add pix but how do I make additional comments over and above what the system supplies as part of the "depositing process" on the cache page.
  14. OK, I placed a TB at a new location and logged the cache site and made comments on the cache site just fine. The TB also shows up in the system as being in the new cache. Now I would like to go to the TB page and enter a comment there, etc. I see how to add pix but how do I make additional comments over and above what the system supplies as part of the "depositing process" on the cache page.
  15. Chipper3

    Macintosh User

    I found this web site for a MAC OSX prodcut but haven't checked it out yet. http://www.gpsy.com/
  16. Tim, I did a poor job of finding caches until I started using maps and a compass as part of my tool kit. I get the waypoint from the cache site. I get a street map to get me into the "neighborhood." I get an arial shot from lostinthewoods and place the target waypoint as well as at least another waypoint from a physical location that I am sure I CAN find. I might get a topo as well. I use a compass on the map and obtain a bearing from the known point to the target point. I go to the waypoint that I can identify and then use the compass to obtain a bearing and start walking. I use the gps to get distance from target and stop at 0. If I don't use the gps then you need two known waypoints and then triangulate. The gps is nice when you have to get off "the line" But I beleive I can get to within 50 foot of any target using the above technique and at the end of the day, you have to put the gps away and use common sense and the hints to find the cache anyway. Try this plan before buying that gps and see how you do. Restrict your searches to caches that don't have multiple part as you want be able to handle the 2nd waypoint without a gps.
  17. When LOGGING A FIND, what are the coordinates for the log entry referring to? where you are typing the entry or what your gps said the coordinates where or..... tnx
  18. Chipper3

    Macintosh User

    Part of my GPS hardware selection criteria is the ability to interface with a G4 Macintosh. I want to be able to download the maps and use the other software available. Is one model GPS better than others for this compatability? I am leaning to the SportTrack series. What software would I use to take advantage of the wp downloads used on the geocache site? thx
  19. I am new to Geocaching and want to minimize my investment until I am sure I like it. I have an old Eagle Explorer unit which is about 5-6 years old. I realize that techology changes rapidly. I don't want to add to my frustration on the learning curve by using "bad" technology. Will this unit get the job done until I am ready for an upgrade?
  20. I notice that some avatars have a default name like geocacher and some have a custom name. How do I create the custom name instead of the default geocacher? How do I create teh Signature for inclusion in the post when Signature box is checked? Thanks
  21. Consider getting a small rubber stamp with an ICON you like or have one made to suit you at a "scrapbook" store and you can use in the log or to make a "card."
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