Jump to content

SiliconFiend

Members
  • Posts

    358
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by SiliconFiend

  1. I ordered mine from Amazon and it was $243.xx (free shipping) I just checked to see, and it's showing as $239.85. Where do you find it (at Amazon) for $217? This is where I got mine ...... http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00...ractiveda742-20 Umm... If you bought from that link, I hope you know you got the Legend HCx, not the Vista HCx. That's not a problem if you don't care for the electronic compass and altimeter.
  2. I have a theory about this. I believe the internal memory requires more power than the flash memory. If it's RAM, that would make sense, because it has to refresh the memory continually. If it's internal flash, maybe there's another reason. The statement about the MediaTEK chipset being energy efficient is relative to other high-sensitivity chipsets (namely the Sirf Star III).
  3. It wouldn't have to report it's position to the satellite. It could just have an almanac (sort of) for timezone boundaries, like it does for tide tables, etc. That data could be broadcast from the satellites (unlikely; waste of bandwidth for rarely-changing data) or updated by computer (or with firmware) for times when legislators screw with daylight savings.
  4. I don't think you mis used the terminlogy. GPX is a file standard with "extensions". Any GPX reader can read the basics. What would make a GPS truly useful to geoachers though is to be able to read those extensions. Because any GPX file user can create the extensions they want, and those can vary all over the place, they are not universal. That's the problem that needs solved. But your idea is a good one and I'd like to be able to dump my PDA for just the GPS and just upload a GPX file to the GPS and be done. Yes, but a device manufacturer could come out and say "here's the standard/extensions we're going to support" and the community would quickly make the data available in that format (as long as it wasn't stupid!). Heck, it could probably be just a simple XSLT to convert. I just got introduced to geocaching by my dad a couple months ago (I've been aware of it for a long time, just never done it). I asked him "What's the paper for?" For as long as geocaching has been around, I can't believe device manufacturers haven't come up with something to accomplish this. I understand they have legacy embedded systems/databases, etc. to support, but honestly, this can't be that hard. Even if they just showed a stinkin' text file with up to 1000 characters!
  5. I'm not sure what you mean by "only ... multi-point autoroutes based on map data". Using the "Routes" screen, you can create a new route to follow, which is a series of waypoints (or really anything you can select from the "Find" menu). When you're done, click "Navigate" (I think that's what the button is called), then tell it to Follow Road (assuming you're set up to Prompt), and it should autoroute you to each point in sequence. I hope this helps; maybe I misunderstood what you wrote.
  6. I know this issue has gotten a fair amount of airtime in this forum, but has anyone raised the issue with Garmin? Do they even know that it's a problem that needs to be addressed?
  7. Unfortunately, yes, that is normal. It's a small annoyance, but easily fixed by clicking the power/backlight button twice to restore your "user" backlight level.
  8. To answer your question, the Vista HCx (and, I assume, the others) can accept a 14-character waypoint name (although I believe GSAK and maybe other software currently only support it as 10-character).
  9. It's a combination of map accuracy and GPS accuracy (that's why you'll see the ring shrink if you had the unit in your pocket and suddenly turn it face up to the sky and the satellite signals improve). If the map has a limited number of bits for accuracy (I think max is 24 bits, which I think is ~1.2 meters), then your ring will necessarily be larger because it can't pinpoint you on the map (the map is too granular).
  10. Is it maybe that you have to enter 06 instead of just 6? What's an example of the complete coordinates you're having a problem with? Ok, here is one I am trying to use N45.35360 W075.73397 the 7 that I bolded is the one I can not enter. My gps only goes to number 5 then back to 0. I have followed the other advice above and set it up as advised. Any other advice before I return this and get a better one? Thanks Rob Those coordinates you have posted look like decimal degrees (i.e., ddd.ddddd), so to enter those (assuming Garmin), go to Setup->Units->Position Format and choose hddd.ddddd. However, most of the coordinates you get from geocaching.com are in degrees decimal minutes, so you'll probably want to have your unit in hddd mmm.mmm normally.
  11. I found that recently, too, and it doesn't always seem to be a matter of too few points. In one case, around Lake Mendocino just east of Ukiah, CA, we were camping and it showed our campsite in the lake, which was off by about 100 meters. The strange thing is, I also had the USGS 100k quads loaded as a custom map, and they ALSO showed me in the same location, in the lake. Also, the basemap in the basic Mapsource Waypoint manager software showed the same thing! So, I'm guessing the unit and Mapsource basemaps are using the USGS 100k data (at least in the US, duh), some of which is spotty (maybe it has incorrect datum information).
  12. Ah. You've encountered the very void that I was complaining about a couple weeks ago. There is no mapping product that has comprehensive routable trails (the Garmin National Parks 24k series do, but coverage is only within the National Parks). cGPSMapper can create maps for Garmin, and if you are willing to share your maps with the public, you can use Mapcenter (http://mapcenter.cgpsmapper.com) to access the full version to compile maps. I'm working on collecting trail data and I will submit some maps to fill this void.
  13. Oh, that's an easy one. The Vista HCx has an electronic compass and barometric altimeter. Otherwise the two units are the same. There's a comparison tool on Garmin's site.
  14. The shp file has the actual geometry in it. The shx file is an index. The prj file is a text file that contains the projection information (datum, spheroid, etc.) The dbf file is a dBase database table that associates attributes to the geometry. That's the one that will help you the most, probably. It can have names, types, whatever. Excel can open the dbf files. I'm not sure about the sbn and sbx files. The problem with shapefiles is in importing them into another format. Shapefiles have no built-in type association for a given point, polyline or polygon (that is, to distinguish that a particular polyline is a stream vs. a city border)--that's what the dbf file is generally used for, but it's dataset-specific. So, if you have a shapefile that has lots of different types of geometry in it (for example, trails mixed in with roads and you want to separate out the trails), you can look in the DBF file and see if the trails have a particular value (e.g., a type code or name) in one of the columns. Then you can use ogr2ogr to extract only those elements into a new shapefile set. For example, ogr2ogr -f "ESRI Shapefile" -t_srs WGS84 -where "TYPE_COL='trail'" outputdir infile.shp Specifying -t_srs WGS84 will read the projection in the prj file and convert it to WGS84, which GPS devices use. This information may not help you directly, but I wanted to share what I discovered so that other people could take advantage of it. Sorry, I typed that fast this morning and forgot the -where clause originally...
  15. I couldn't agree more. I'm not going to knock electronic compasses, especially if all you do is city and park geocaching, but it always amazes me how many folks will head out into the wilderness without such an inexpensive and invaluable tool. Or don't know how to use one! [off topic] Enjoy your trip! Heading out there is on my "must do" list, so I'll be there one of these days. I think most people are using the electronic compass for what it is--a convenience. The e-compass is nice such that the pointer will point at the waypoint/cache when you're standing still. I agree that you shouldn't rely solely on an consumer electronic device for your survival, but that doesn't make the e-compass worthless.
  16. Assuming you're talking about the US, the US Census TIGER files are probably your best bet, but you'll have to convert them to .MP format so it can be compiled by cGPSMapper. Their accuracy is not the greatest but they work okay--at least they show the streets and names. Also, they won't be routable without a lot of work... If you want routable maps, just pony up the $110 for CityNavigator. Or you could look at MetroGuide from Garmin for cheaper, non-routable street maps (but can be made routable with a hack, I've heard).
  17. I actually did a little looking and found the data on a website here. I think I went through the metadata gateway; it seemed to work better than the vector data gateway. I wish the National Park Service had data that good. (For some reason I can't find any trail data for Redwoods National Park; maybe I'll send an email.) Anyway, the reason I mentioned FWTools is that it can easily convert the coordinates and datum to WGS84. It can also output to KML (Google Earth file), too, which I believe GPSBabel can deal with. GPSBabel works great for GPS tracks, waypoints, etc. but it doesn't convert to any map-compatible format easily, so I haven't used it much. OGR2OGR is just a really powerful tool. I'm considering writing a couple drivers for it (one for geonames.org POI data and another for cGPSMapper .MP files). I don't know anything about the NG Topo format, though, sorry.
  18. It may be projected in a coordinate system and not in Lat/Lon WGS84 (NAD83). If that is the case, ogr2ogr can fix that, too. You'll need to install the FWTools package to get that functionality, though, because it links to the Proj.4 library to do projections. Then you just run ogr2ogr on the shapefile with the argument "-t_srs WGS84" (without the quotes) and it will give you the shapefile set in WGS84 lat/lon coordinates. The FWTools package is free/open source; I just find it very useful.
  19. Where did you get the source data? I'm trying to compile a comprehensive set of trail maps. By the way, ogr2ogr (part of FWTools) is a great tool for converting/manipulating vector data. The -where option can create a filtered data set.
  20. Data for county lines is readily available from online GIS repositories. You could create your own map from that. It takes some determination, though... Okay, I took pity on you. See here: CA_counties.img. (Go easy on my server; no guarantee of uptime). I also put the source mp file in the pub/maps directory if someone wants to tweak it. My source for data was http://www.biogeog.ucsb.edu/projects/gap/gap_data.html with format and coordinate transformation via ogr2ogr, then combined in GPSMapEdit and converted to Garmin img with cGPSMapper (whew! I told you it takes determination...) He's working with Magellan...not Garmin. Eh. I misread that as sendmap. Oh, well, maybe someone else will get some use out of it (I already did and I learned more about the map tools I'm using, so it wasn't a total loss).
  21. Data for county lines is readily available from online GIS repositories. You could create your own map from that. It takes some determination, though... Okay, I took pity on you. See here: CA_counties.img. (Go easy on my server; no guarantee of uptime). I also put the source mp file in the pub/maps directory if someone wants to tweak it. My source for data was http://www.biogeog.ucsb.edu/projects/gap/gap_data.html with format and coordinate transformation via ogr2ogr, then combined in GPSMapEdit and converted to Garmin img with cGPSMapper (whew! I told you it takes determination...)
  22. Data for county lines is readily available from online GIS repositories. You could create your own map from that. It takes some determination, though...
  23. Yes, it put it on and off and on again, off and on an.. - i myself thought - i cannot be the only one (i mean stupid) who has problems with the shieldzone. From the put on/off multiple times with my fingers the shieldzone got on fingerprint i could not remove. I was concerned about fingerprints too, since mine were showing up, but reapplying the spray (every time!) made them disappear.
  24. Thanks for reporting Freeday. If we can get a groundswell going we may be able to get Shieldzone to get their sizes right because their product is excellent. Please keep us posted. I ordered the "invisibleSHIELD - Screen Protector: eTrex Color" along with my Vista HCx from Offroute.com and was also disappointed with the fit. I took it off and re-placed it about 4 times, trying different orientations (and once to get a cat hair off, dangit--make sure your workspace is lint and hair-free). I also tried to trim it with a new, sharp razor blade but had no success. I would have preferred slightly small over slightly large--with the overhanging edge it picks up crap and risks peeling up at the edges.
  25. I noticed a bug in the Vista HCX 2.20 firmware (maybe one of you with 2.30 can confirm if it's still there): If you change the Position format in the units setup to hddd.ddddd (maybe others as well), the format on the map screen is still hddd mm.mmm if you display the location in one wide data field. Weirdly, if you display 2 wide data fields, by default it will show the location twice; the top one will be in the wrong format, but the bottom one will follow your format preferences. Where is the official place to go to report firmware bugs to Garmin?
×
×
  • Create New...