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SiliconFiend

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Everything posted by SiliconFiend

  1. I'm guessing these are polish format (mp) files? You could send me the files (I'm not sure about the capabilities of this forum--I guess you can't attach files; don't know about private messages). I can take a look at them and see if there's anything weird. Also, there's a Yahoo support group: http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/map_authors/
  2. GPSMapEdit can import ESRI shapefiles (SHP), which I believe is the standard ArcGIS format. If not, you can likely use ogr2ogr (part of the GDAL package at www.gdal.org) to convert it to SHP. You might need to do a significant amount of editing afterwards, to get the types to line up to what you want. Note that you can also edit the DBF file in Excel before you import and add a Type field that corresponds to the point/line/polygon type you want. I'll spare you the gory details here.
  3. Did you use the Webupdater software? Garmin doesn't seem to always have all the downloads listed for a particular unit, but Webupdater should pick it up, or tell you that you're up to date. Failing that, let us know what Garmin says.
  4. Actually I have lock on roads set to off. I went on a hike today found a geocache - the location was perfect. When I got home I loaded the track onto mapsource on the computer and after reviewing I noticed that it showed me crossing a road that I wasn't even close too. Later in the hike it showed me on the wrong side of a road by at least 200 ft. If you only have the basemap (no other map products installed), it has a very coarse resolution, so errors like this are common (although 200 ft does seem extreme).
  5. When you say "edit saved tracks" I assume you mean the simplification that the GPS does when you select "Save"? If Garmin's smart (and they seem to be), they'll have libraries of code that are common across several or all GPS platforms. The track log function is probably one of them. So, I would guess it's a legacy function to save memory. Back when memory was still expensive, it made sense to conserve that precious resource. The small amount of internal memory probably still helps them to keep the per-unit costs down. It may help with trackback, too, but it seems like that function could just ignore the timestamps and work with an "active copy" that's been simplified, while keeping the original data intact.
  6. Yes, it's called a Vista HCx. Sorry. That's extremely weird and I'd think Garmin would be very interested in fixing it (although, maybe not, for a very old model). The Vista model may be a bit old (released around 2001, I believe), but Garmin is still promoting them on the website, and both of my units were brand new, and both showed the problem within a few days of purchase. In both cases, I was running the latest sysem software (3.70, released June 12, 2006). I'll just have to wait and see what Garmin and / or the local reseller come up with, I guess! Sorry for being "age-ist". (2001 really isn't that long ago...!) You're right, though--Garmin likes to hold on to superseded models. Which is good in terms of support, anyway, but can lead to confusion. I thought of something else--you updated the system software, but did you also update the chipset software? I don't know about the Vista in particular but I think at least all the "x" models have two parts to the firmware, and you have to run the Webupdater twice to catch everything. If the chipset software were out of sync with the system software, I could see how it could potentially cause weird problems such as you're seeing.
  7. I can't think of a good reason not to record to the SD card. It may be that using Mapsource and the Active log are sufficient for your purposes, but recording to the SD card won't interfere with that; it's more like a backup. Note that when you "Save" a track on your GPS you actually lose data. It "simplifies" the points to reduce the quantity (thus making the track coarser) and more importantly, it strips out the timestamps. I don't know why Garmin thinks a "Save" operation should lead to a net loss of data, but whatever.
  8. Since you have maps loaded, it could be the "lock to road" feature is trying to snap your coordinates to the nearest road. Try disabling that and see if it makes a difference.
  9. Yes, it's called a Vista HCx. Sorry. That's extremely weird and I'd think Garmin would be very interested in fixing it (although, maybe not, for a very old model).
  10. Check that your Datum is set to WGS84. (I think it's under Main Menu->Setup->Units). That would cause a systemic error such as you're describing.
  11. Looky here: http://gpsinformation.net/main/gpsspeed.htm or here: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=A...80cbcac8b025e4a or here: http://forums.gpsworld.com/archive/index.php?t-10.html
  12. You're correct about the backlight and battery consumption, of course, but there is the possibility that there is something about the screen construction on the 60CSx that makes the backlight less efficient. It's likely that the Vista HCx uses a newer LCD possibly from a different manufacturer, and perhaps some work has been done to make the transflective LCD better at passing backlight through. There is also the issue that the 60CSx has a physically larger screen (by a good percentage), so for the same electrical power, you get less light intensity. All in all, though, good points. I do think the biggest difference is the chipset.
  13. BOY, YOU BET! I'd miss that too. I don't have an Etrex but I like my 60CX fine. I also loved the feel of my old map76. I think the smaller sized etrex would bother me as well as the button features. Choice is a good thing. If those are truly important to you, it's possible to get North American tide stations on the Vista HCx. It may take some work, but it can be done. Search this forum; the answer is there. Basically it involves downloading and installing the GPSMAP 162/168 tide points from Garmin. Hint: It's much easier if you already own a Garmin map product.
  14. I will say that I have noticed that antenna orientation does seem to make a difference with my Vista HCx. The reported satellite signal strength and position error both seem to improve when it's facing directly up. You can test it quickly yourself--just hold it sideways and look at the signal strength, then turn it facing up and notice the change. Having said that, it's probably irrelevant to maintaining a position fix. I've only gotten it to lose a signal lock deep inside a parking structure or in a tunnel. Inside a building is usually no problem. When I'm out for a walk, I often keep it in my pants pocket and it has no problem.
  15. 1. Yes, that problem still exists with the latest HCx firmware. And I think it's been fixed. Garmin has released firmware version 2.40 for the Vista HCx, with the note: "Changed odometer calculation to more closely match track log distance." http://www8.garmin.com/support/download_details.jsp?id=3709 Well... they made it better, but according to testers, it still doesn't register very slow movement (such as when you're taking your time climbing a steep grade). It may or may not be able to be fixed by a firmware update. It's up to you to decide if that function is critical to you.
  16. Your explanation is very much in line with my thinking on it, too. The strange thing is that the high-sensitivity Sirf Star III chipset on the 60CSx doesn't seem to have this problem, so it may be chipset-specific problem. If that's the case, it may or may not be able to be fixed via a firmware update.
  17. Very cool, thanks for the info! I've never used subversion before, but unless "soon" is within the next week or so, I think that'll be changing. I can't guarantee that it'll be that soon (we had planned a release in May...) But it's good to learn Subversion anyway--it's widely used in open-source projects. If you're using Windows, a good way to get started might be TortoiseSVN--it integrates into the Windows shell. If you have any questions about it, please post on the Gallery2 third-party plugin support forum (http://gallery.menalto.com/forum/75). I monitor that and respond there as well. Okay, so it was sooner than I thought. Map module version 0.5.3 for Gallery2 has been released. You can grab it from the Sourceforge downloads page: http://sourceforge.net/projects/gmap-module/ I'll get it into DownloadablePlugins soon so you can download and install it from your Gallery site admin page.
  18. Well, I think the original issue issue was not that it was undersized, it was that it was oversized. The problem with that is that it collects dust and junk on the edge, and at the top and bottom, it could even wrinkle the screen protector. Both of these situations could lead to the protector gradually peeling up at the edges. The later pictures are after some back-and-forth with the manufacturer and I think are just an illustration of the frustration with their imprecision--if they're going to fix it, why not get it exactly right? The screen protectors for the other models don't seem to have any fit problems.
  19. Very cool, thanks for the info! I've never used subversion before, but unless "soon" is within the next week or so, I think that'll be changing. I can't guarantee that it'll be that soon (we had planned a release in May...) But it's good to learn Subversion anyway--it's widely used in open-source projects. If you're using Windows, a good way to get started might be TortoiseSVN--it integrates into the Windows shell. If you have any questions about it, please post on the Gallery2 third-party plugin support forum (http://gallery.menalto.com/forum/75). I monitor that and respond there as well.
  20. I'm one of the developers for the Google Map module for Gallery 2 (it's a third-party plugin), which is what -Oz- is using. It can read the coordinates from the EXIF header (which is what geotagging writes to your photos). It can export to Google Earth as well. A planned feature is to allow you to include any data on the map via KML (so you could include your tracks that way). You can download the module via SVN from http://gmap-module.svn.sourceforge.net/svn...2.1/modules/map (Nevermind the Gallery2.1 in the URL--it works with 2.1 and 2.2+) We are going to release a new version "soon", if you don't want to use subversion.
  21. I haven't heard people complaining about this specifically with the new HCx units, in fact I thought I read it was fixed, but you could be right. In any case, it seems to be a problem when the units are exposed to heat (i.e., left in the car).
  22. Perhaps Garmin is reluctant to fix the odometer problem as it may sway potential 60CSX buyers to the HCX series if they did. Perhaps when the 60CSX inventory is sufficiently reduced to bring out a replacement model, the odometer will get fixed on the HCX. Sorry, but that's laughable. I seriously doubt Garmin would intentionally cripple a product just to sell you on the upgrade. They're not used-car salesmen. More likely it's a difficult problem to solve and they're still learning about quirks with the MediaTek chipset.
  23. I think the altimeter thing is a red herring. I think someone mis-read a review and then posted about it. I haven't read anything in a review, etc. that says the altimeter is slower than the previous model. There is a difference from the previous units in that it can't record the altitude/pressure while the unit is powered off. I don't know about the Topo maps, since I don't have those loaded, but it is reasonably responsive to drawing detailed road networks (it might take a second or two to fill in after a pan). I haven't played with the older models much, but I understand this unit is much faster in drawing maps.
  24. That may be strictly accurate in that newer, high sensitivity GPSrs don't have any fancy new hardware or software that will magically result in a more accurate fix. However, in comparison to the less sensitive receivers, they are effectively more accurate simply because they can hold on to more satellites (and more satellites generally means a more precise fix), so under trees or other difficult conditions, you can still get a good accuracy reading with the new models where you might get poor accuracy or no reading at all with the older ones (that's the extreme of poor accuracy!).
  25. I've tried it both ways and have found that using waas doesn't seem to help any. I leave it disabled since i don't see any difference and figure it may serve to shorten battery life. You may want to rethink that. One simple test might not show you the difference. There's another thread on here within the last 2 months or so where someone posted a picture of two tracklogs while the GPSr was stationary--with WAAS and without WAAS. The track points with WAAS were clustered much more tightly around the single point with fewer outliers than the track points recorded without WAAS. It may not be reflected in your reported accuracy (not sure about that point), but your real-world accuracy is going to be closer to the best-case (probably +/- 3 meters) a higher percentage of the time with WAAS enabled.
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