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simpjkee

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Posts posted by simpjkee

  1. I see from their join dates that none of the prior posters were around at the time of the Great Pocket Cache Debate of 2006. All posts forming a part of the Great Pocket Cache Debate of 2006, including but not limited to the views of Groundspeak's CEO regarding the multiple logging of event caches, are hereby incorporated into this thread by this reference as if fully set forth herein.

    Seeing as though a feature such as this one was never implemented back then (and still isn't), I imagine Jeremy posted something like 'there are no leaderboards in geocaching so mind your own logging practices and who cares if others want to log events multiple times', right? You gotta link to the post of his views?

  2. No, I suppose writing the date is not necessary, but just do it. It's not too much to ask. Are you in such a hurry that you can't take 5 seconds to write it?

     

    I know its gunna sound crazy, but I hand write, in pen, the date and my whole username on the log of every cache I find. :o

     

    If you were to do the E.T. highway it would take you and extra 2 hours if you spent 5 seconds on each cache writing the date.

     

    I write the date in most caches with the exception of nanos, Also when I did route 66 I signed each cache with just an "R" to save time.

    yeah, so?

     

    If you're strapped for time, why do you try to do so many caches?

     

    Well, for one that would be 2 hours less of burning gas so assuming someone is going to do the E.T. highway would you want them to do it as quick as possible to minimize emissions?

    I'd rather people hike the ET Powertrail to minimize emissions.

  3. As to what kind of picture is acceptable is really up to the cache owner. Every cache owner is different.

     

    That said, if you find one of my caches, please feel free to post any and all pictures (of the container/hide or otherwise)!

     

    I have a multicache and some people posted pics of the final location. I thought it was cool and look forward to the day that someone will try to skip the first stage and find the final based off the picture. I would get a kick out of that kind of detective work, but it still hasn't happened yet....that I know of.

  4. As to what kind of picture is acceptable is really up to the cache owner. Every cache owner is different, but there is general ettiquette on pics that people above me have already posted.

     

    That said, if you find one of my caches, please feel free to post any and all pictures (of the container/hide or otherwise)!

  5. I am able to view the comments in the geocache visits text file that Starbrand mentioned. That is the only way I have found to view the comments. I can upload the file in to the field notes page on geocaching.com, but it does not load the comments. I keep the text file open on my pc and upload it to the website at the same time while logging my finds online.

  6. No, I suppose writing the date is not necessary, but just do it. It's not too much to ask. Are you in such a hurry that you can't take 5 seconds to write it?

     

    I know its gunna sound crazy, but I hand write, in pen, the date and my whole username on the log of every cache I find. :o

     

    If you were to do the E.T. highway it would take you and extra 2 hours if you spent 5 seconds on each cache writing the date.

     

    I write the date in most caches with the exception of nanos, Also when I did route 66 I signed each cache with just an "R" to save time.

    yeah, so?

     

    If you're strapped for time, why do you try to do so many caches?

  7. Since I usually have my pen at the ready to sign, I jam it in the center hole of the rolled up log and quickly pull back. The log either comes out stuck on the pen tip or it comes out just enough to grab a hold of it.

    That used to be my preferred method, but I have since switched to tweezers.

     

    I just use my fingers to roll up the log. I've had a lot of practice rolling papers.

  8. No, I suppose writing the date is not necessary, but just do it. It's not too much to ask. Are you in such a hurry that you can't take 5 seconds to write it?

     

    I know its gunna sound crazy, but I hand write, in pen, the date and my whole username on the log of every cache I find. :o

  9. FTF is meaningless

    BINGO!

    Just because you and i strongly disagree, doesn't give you the right to misquote me by taking three words out of context.

     

    FTF means a lot to some. Nothing wrong with that - it's one aspect of the game.

     

    I say keep FTF meaningful by not having pre-publication finds. That reeks of unfairness.

     

     

    Edit: The beta-testing is commendable - it helps avoid glitches in coords, cache description, etc. But the pre-publication finder had no competition for FTF. Think of the consequences of Josh's view - if FTF matters to someone, they have much less incentive to seek out your cache when published, knowing the log already was signed by the CO's buddy.

    but it is meaningless.

     

    ok, what if I place a cache and someone stumbles upon it and signs the log before the reviewer gets around to publishing it. did the person not get FTF? What if my great grandpa put out a geocache 100 years ago and hundreds of people have found it. I decide to submit it on gc.com and it gets published. Is the next person to find it the FTF?

     

    I think you are confusing 2 different things. Being the first to find a geocache and being first to find a geocache after it is published on gc.com. You can claim you were first to find the cache after it was published on gc.com, but if someone found it before you (as in the op's case), you are not first to find. The first to find is the person who found it first regardless of when it was published on gc.com. To suggest that the prepublication finder was cheating or something is absolutely ludicrous.

  10. The first thing I do is sign the log.

     

    ( i have had people say to me that thats not my job and thats the owners job and i should just be geocaching and show the owner that it was wet.. but in some cases what if the owner lives to far away i think its just a thank ya for the cache and i dryed it so you dont have to worry maybe added a piece of paper or two to make others enjoy:D)

     

    If the onwer can't maintain it, they shouldn't own it.

    In my area, many countryside caches are far far away from anything. Then you're talking about a 2-3 hour hike in the mountains just to get to the cache, making maintaining a cache a full day trip. A few weeks ago I went for a cache that was over three hours hike from the nearest transport (a ferry that sails twice daily), and four hours hike from the nearest road.

     

    It's normal for me to have a basic cache repair kit with me. Usually not empty boxes, but at least a spare log book, some plastic bags, and I have a few self made log rolls for nanos and picos (replaced several full or near-full logs over time). I think it's very reasonable to spend three minutes cleaning up a container, instead of asking CO to spend a whole day to do just that, which is going to take a long time usually before they can schedule the trip, and in the meantime other cachers come to a cache that could have been in much better shape.

     

    Myself I own over 70 listings. Many are really remote or on high mountain peaks, and get a few visits a year (or less). I'm very happy to know that most cachers here will do some maintenance if they find something wrong with the cache that can be fixed easily. And otherwise I'll just put a maintenance visit on my to-do list, and usually get to it within a few months. A bit longer if waiting for autumn/winter to arrive.

    I have 5 caches that are 'out in the countryside' by your description. I am more than happy to maintain them if needed. I could have many more, but I don't know I can commit to maintaining more than that right now. I would expect someone who places a cache (in the countryside or not) to be willing to maintain their caches. It sounds like you are. Thanks for that.

  11. The first thing I do is sign the log.

     

    ( i have had people say to me that thats not my job and thats the owners job and i should just be geocaching and show the owner that it was wet.. but in some cases what if the owner lives to far away i think its just a thank ya for the cache and i dryed it so you dont have to worry maybe added a piece of paper or two to make others enjoy:D)

     

    If the onwer can't maintain it, they shouldn't own it.

     

    Drying a log is not maintenance, it's courtesy. If you can't dry a log you shouldn't cache.

    I was referring to the "what if the owner lives to far away" part. Not so much the drying out the log part. However, if the log is wet, its a pretty clear indication that the cache needs some maintainence. You can dry it out, but until the owner maintains it, it will just get wet again.

  12. So many cool ideas that really are not possible due to practical reasons.

     

    As previously stated, getting finders to properly reset the thing will be 'difficult'.

     

    I want a cache where you lean on the correct tree branch and the tree opens up revealing a circular staircase to the underground bunker.

     

    Only in the movies my friend, only in the movies.

     

    Underground bunker? Definite guidelines violation!

  13. My husband and I started caching last summer. I became interested in caching while taking a literacy class for my Ed.d work at the U of R, in which i have learned there are many cool hidden caches. We soon became addicted. I began logging our finds, though not faithfully. We have found many caches and have had many good life learning experiences while on our adventures. I have heard stories about some players not putting the cach back after planting an item inside. Is this true?

    I suppose it happens from time to time. The cache should be replaced as found however.

     

    Am I a lurker? Not quite sure! I do wish I had more time for caching. this forum jazz is new to me and is going to be my digital experience for the class I'm taking now on Advanced Seminar Digital Epstemologies. I hope to find through this interaction how humans use geocaching in relation to digital literacies for learning. I am welccome to some feedback in any form

    You're wondering how I 'use geocaching in relation to digital literacies for learning'? I'm not sure exactly what you're asking... :huh:

     

    What are some of the practices you use? Do you think that spending time in an affinity space is beneficial to learning?

    An affinity space? I have no idea what you're talking about. :blink:

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