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shawhh

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Everything posted by shawhh

  1. recommend a baseplate compass by any of the 3 major manufacturers: silva, suunto, or brunton. don't need to spend a lot of money on your first. adjustable declination is nice if you're going to be working off of maps, but not necessary for geocaching. adjustable declination can be had on compasses from all 3 of the above for under 50 bucks. check out THECOMPASSSTORE.COM. gi lensatic compass is good, but for map work you'll need to acquire a map protractor, wheras the baseplate compasses incorporate this feature. -harry
  2. another brand to consider is Native Eyewear. i got a pair this summer and have been very pleased. 0.6 oz, polarized lenses, interchangeable lenses, lifetime guarantee. took them on a vacation trip to the carribean, and have used them canoeing and kayaking this summer and have nothing bad to say about them at all. i do recommend trying on any new style you might like to check and make sure it fits your face. the model that worked best for me was the Dash xp. - good luck on your search. -harry
  3. june 2001. still here, though not as active as i once was. -harry
  4. thanks for the information. perhaps someday they'll do away with the limit. -harry
  5. eaparks, thanks for the prompt reply. figured it had to be something like that. how did you know about the limit on map segments? i've been searching all over the place for that kind of info. oh, yeah, i was talking about the topo eastern u.s. again, thanks for the prompt reply. harry
  6. hey guys, just got a 2 gb card for my 76csx. should hold the whole eastern us (656.9 mb), but when i tried to send it to my gpsr i kept getting a message stating that the file contained "529 items too many for the device". can anyone here give some assistance? i have the most current software updates to both my gpsr and mapsource. -harry
  7. WILDLIFE averages about 1 find per year. why? it sure isn't a driveby! tough terrain. didn't expect it to get many finds. judging by the feedback i get, the folks that do find it get a great deal of satisfaction in having overcome the challenge inherent in an extreme cache. they're the ones i hid it for. -harry
  8. go to the usda forest service website. www.fs.fed.gov (i think) use the select a forest drop down menu and choose uwharrie. from there should be a piece of cake. can download a trail map of the uwharrie trail. good luck. -harry
  9. great thread. criminal, i agree completely. once, on a winter backpack along the AT, i arrived at a shelter tired, cold, and alone. the wood in the area was damp and try as i might, i couldn't get a fire going the usual way. i finally resorted to using a bit of white gas from my stove to liven things up. the resultant fireball succeeded in starting the wood and nicely woke me up as well. seems while my cold fingers were attempting to light a match the gasoline vaporized in the confined space of the fireplace! i can assure you it was an attention getter. commercial fire starters and matches work well together. starting a fire under emergency conditions geometrically increases the difficulty compared to doing it in less severe times. i think the moral is to try not to let yourself (if possible) get to the point where it is desperately necessary to perform. and truly, experiment with the technology you plan to use to save your life. -harry
  10. add on for me. had always been active out of doors-hiking, hunting, fishing, canoeing, backpacking. bought a gpsr in preparation for a trip through the ten thousand island region of the everglades. wound up not needing it to navigate (years of experience using map and compass). gpsr just laid around until 2001 when i read about geocaching in backpacker magazine. 900+ finds later, i've seen places near and far that i wouldn't have otherwise seen. -harry
  11. suunto m3 global. use it orienteering, hiking off trail (and on), and caching. has seen me safely across many an adventure.
  12. one of my caches, hidden near camp mackall, n.c. was found by a group of special forces students on a training mission. they signed the log and traded a cammo stick for a hot wheels car. cache rehidden as i had left it. -harry
  13. looks to be either a burrowing, or forest wolf spider (Family: lycosidae). not a fishing spider (Family: pisauridae). harmless. -harry
  14. agree with briansnat, however if your bees are like our hornets here in the southeastern u.s. they will attack a light source shining on their nest. be careful where and for how long you let the light linger on a place. harry
  15. while i am not a big fan of micro's in places that would hold a traditional trading cache, i don't hate them either. i have however become quite selective in where i'll go to look for a cache. walmart parking lots, no thanks. nice parks, unique landmarks, and historical sites will attract me however no matter the cache size. now, having said that, the one thing i do really hate is a micro hidden in an environment in such a way as to invite frustrated cachers to trash the area. unfortunately, i see this all too often in woodland settings. use some sense in placing your cache no matter the size, but especially if placed in an area that could (and will) be trashed if your average cacher becomes frustrated. 3 war vet, come look for mine just south of your area. no micro's by me, and one of mine is fairly notorious (WILDLIFE). -harry
  16. hi, just to let you know, it is considered bad form to come to the forums asking for help on someones puzzle. good luck getting an additional hint from the cache owner. harry
  17. great pics. i'm betting though that that hawk will be miffed at being called a buzzard. -harry
  18. different states have different laws. in my home state of N.C. different counties have different laws regarding trespassing. it behooves you to become knowledgeable regarding the laws in your state and any local ordinances regarding trespassing. i know for sure in north carolina you don't necessarily even have to see the land owner to be cited for trespassing. -harry
  19. Registered Nurse in a cardiac intensive care unit.
  20. congratulations on the milestone. -harry
  21. can't help you with the explorist, but the foretrex 101 is a very good basic gpsr. no complaints. -harry
  22. i've used gpsdiscount.com several times and have nothing bad to say about them at all. very pleased with their service. -harry
  23. i have a foretrex 101 and a gpsmap76s. the foretrex is a good basic gps unit that has worked just fine for me. i really have no complaints against it except the wrist strap is just a bit on the skimpy side for my wrist. i use it when i don't need mapping, or when i just want to be less obvious in certain caching situations, or if i'm just in a minimalist mood. however, i would not discount the advantages to be had in a mapping unit. i mostly use the gpsmap 76s rather than the foretrex only because it has maps! if i was only going to have one gpsr i would certainly choose one with mapping. otherwise, they both will accurately obtain lock, plot your position, and will carry you to a waypoint. hope this helps. -harry
  24. voodoodancer, the green swamp is a great place! i've canoed and camped through the swamp on the waccamaw river. welcome to caching. good to see another swamp lover out and about. -harry
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