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paleolith

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Everything posted by paleolith

  1. I don't understand why the blog link is a problem. If it's considered commercial just because it's on blogspot, then host it on your own web site. The one Stash DNF I looked at was pretty uninteresting, pretty much just a link to the blog. I think I'd object to that. If Stash were telling a good story and posting the photos to the cache log, in addition to the link, that would provide something of interest on the cache page. You could also post Stash's story as part of your Found log, so that there isn't any fake log. Now, whether that CO was just irritable to start with, or got irritated by the fake DNFs, I can't tell. It does sound like the spoiler photos claim was bogus, though without examining all of them AND finding the relevant caches, I really can't judge. Hopefully GS won't ask you to stop posting non-spoiler photos. But I'd say just avoid this CO's caches. Edward
  2. I would suggest that you NOT drop the duplicate TB! Offer to mail it to the owner. Edward
  3. Yeah, I'm having a lot of trouble figuring out the Dolphin's complaint too. Exactly when does the log you are reading move off the viewport? I haven't seen that happen. "Find all nearby benchmarks" is above the logs, and I don't remember there ever being any links below the logs except the one to view them all, and there's no longer a need for it, so you never need to page all the way to the end just to find some link. (Are you by any chance using IE4?) In the version released Tuesday, the most recent 25 logs are preloaded, so in many cases you get any logs you need without waiting for them to load. Personally I love it. I can look at all the logs I want without waiting for a full page load. I can look at the last six logs of a cache with a thousand logs without incurring the overhead of listing them all. The only thing missing to me is an easy way to locate a particular log: by a certain cacher, from a certain date, or the publication log. This could be addressed by a search function, or by having a button to load all logs. For the 1% of us who would use it, the load all logs is probably simpler. Edward
  4. Well, isn't that just the most obvious thing in the world? </sarcasm> Seriously, I count 47 links on a normal cache page before even getting to the description, so it wasn't to shorten the page. It could have been placed directly under the state/city, pushing the bearing/distance from home down into the empty line. How many new users will never click on the state/city, just because there's no indication that it's a map link? I would not have guessed. In UI jargon, there's no affordability that it's a map link. And because nearly every article in Wikipedia links to other articles whenever a city, state, or country is mentioned, I've become accustomed to ignoring those links. I know, there's also a "view larger map" that does the same thing -- except that it's way down on a page and has a target=_blank so that it OPENS A NEW TAB -- geez folks, I KNOW HOW to open a new tab, so don't assume that you know how to manage my tabs better than I do. That's just RUDE. So I do not think this was exactly the brightest of the changes. (Stops to catch breath.) I thank you very much for ditching GetSatisfaction/UserVoice. I only wish that those of us with prior experience from the user side had been able to save you from doing that. Several other changes are also very welcome. I make these points to try to prove that my view is not all negative. I even like the reformatting of the box where I wish the View Map link still appeared. Ah, who am I kidding, I hate it all. There, now I feel better. Edward
  5. Old maxim: "Stupidity is not illegal". Applies to geocaching. Edward
  6. There seem to be a couple of different issues here. 4wheelin_fool and a couple of others, like jkhuggins, understand that stalking does not necessarily involve physical danger, real or perceived. Creating detrimental psychological conditions is also referred to as stalking. If someone creepy is gathering information about you and making it known to you that they are doing so, that's creepy. Unless you have even thicker skin than most here, that WILL affect your behavior in bad ways. Those who think it doesn't, mostly have not experienced these situations or seen it happen to a family member or close friend. In addition, asking the OP to disclose more information misses the point that more disclosure is exactly what is to be avoided in a stalking situation. OTOH, reviewing the OP's past posts to the forums, and logs to at least one cache, tells me that the OP has exhibited aggressive and inflexible behavior towards other cachers. This person's logs and postings indicate someone with a lot of difficulty figuring out how to get along with others. The basic intentions appear to be fine, but then the inflexibility in working through the situation causes the real problems. So it's even more complex than it appears. Edward
  7. My two challenge caches have similar wording, but you are probably talking about something a bit different. Mine say you are welcome to visit, sign the log, post notes ... and in fact people have done that, posting quite a few note visits. But my caches also require them to revisit the cache after completing the requirements to log the find, and it sounds to me like you are talking about signing the log on one day and logging the find on a much later day without revisiting the cache. Why would people visit my caches to just post notes? Most often it's because they are with a group and some have qualified for the find. In some cases they are passing by and want to go ahead and check it out. Ask toz how well that worked out for him ... In one case the location of the hide has become a bit notorious and I think some are visiting partly to check it out. It's also notable that mine deal with a compact geographical area, so revisiting is not a burden. So I won't claim to be making any statement about how challenge caches in general ought to be run. And as a final note, I'll point out that both of mine contain the statement that "this is for fun and you are on the honor system". Which is just a restatement of geocaching, but after a long list of rules I think it's worth reiterating. Edward
  8. When I was spending time in SoCal, almost all caches I found required a hike of some sort, some short, some long. It's true that I drove to the trailhead, but probably 1% of my finds there required less than a 1/10 mile hike. Now I'm mostly home in Florida and I only cache by bicycle, and by that I mean I start from home. Hasn't built up my count very fast. It's pulling down my terrain average, since I don't get terrain credit for non-required effort. But it helps get me out on the bike, especially when the weather's too hot to enjoy it without a good reason. (This August and this summer were both the hottest and driest on record in Tallahassee. One day in June it hit 105F, the hottest ever recorded here. Rainfall YTD is about half of average.) Edward
  9. Other places to stash photos so they are on gc.com and not dependent on an external host: -- on a log on a cache page which you do not intend to publish -- on a note log, then delete the log -- on a regular note on the cache (meaning they can be viewed directly too) The last can also be a good way to give additional details which are excessive for the description, or things like initial cache contents which are interesting at the time but not ten years later (and you've surely seen old cache pages that still list the initial contents even though the container has been replaced twice). Remember that each log has its own URL, so you can link to it from the description. Edward
  10. You can also look at the bookmark list of TPRD caches. As it happens, the TPRD employee / geocacher who set those caches has moved to another department, and the caches are being maintained by local volunteers through TAG. The TPRD account that Joshism linked is now maintained by one of those volunteers. Nonetheless, TPRD definitely continues to support the program, providing cache supplies and geocoin prizes. They also allow private geocaches in city parks, although they have no stated policy. Value? Can't say, and I doubt anyone else can say. The simple number of people added to the attendance at any one park is small. However, many of those end up visiting many of the parks. This may be a fairly vocal group of people who have become aware of just how many parks the city manages -- certainly far more than I was previously aware of. Thus the "branding" may be of more value than the number of recreation visits would indicate. I found five of the TPRD caches Friday, and Saturday I attended a local event which included most of the volunteers mentioned. I'm currently the volunteer maintainer for ... I think it's ten of the caches. I've placed seven of my own caches on the city park in my neighborhood. Edward
  11. This thread is schedule for odd-numbered months, but I guess we'll have to accept a deviation. Usually someone posts a story about logging a DNF on their own cache, but that important part of the scheduled thread seems to have been missed this time. I haven't done it so I can't fill that in. Potato Finder summarized well the two situations where I've logged a find on a cache I owned. In one case, I adopted a cache I had not yet found. I found it and logged a find. Someone else later adopted it from me. In two cases, I logged finds on challenge caches (not Challenges, grr) which I developed and published. No one has ridiculed for doing so, and I was not even close to being FTF on either. (Of course I realize the claim that I have not experienced ridicule invites ridicule, so I'll say now that I'll only listen to such ridicule from others who have found those caches.) I placed two caches which someone else has adopted. Because gc.com does not distinguish between hider and owner, I no longer have any strong link to these caches -- a few notes and owner maintenance logs, but nothing that shows on my profile. I've thought about logging finds just to have these links, but I haven't and probably won't -- after all, a found log is still a weak link. The solution here would be for gc.com to make the hider/owner distinction. All of this really says that it's not your technical relationship to the cache that matters, but whether finding it should be trivial due to your prior relationship with the cache. Edward
  12. I found yet another minor improvement. I can move the log date closer to the log type as follows: .LogType {width:20% !important} .LogType + div {width:76% !important; text-align:left !important} I haven't seen this mess up any other formatting. I'm not entirely sure I prefer it to the default -- while it gets the date back closer to the important stuff, it looks a bit more cluttered, and it's not at the far left as I'd prefer. I'll probably keep it though. As with most of the other CSS spec changes I've proposed, it's independent of the others. (I think I've mentioned before that the date could probably be moved to the far left, but that would require JavaScript as well as CSS.) So here's my complete specs now: /* Make avatars on logs just totally vanish. I don't know whether this prevents the download. */ .logOwnerAvatar {display:none !important} /* Tighten up the spacing in the log. Readability is not reduced at all, due to the alternating background colors and the bold log type. */ .LogDisplayRight .LogText {min-height: 0 !important; padding-top: 0 !important; margin-bottom: 0 !important} /* Try to stop the View Log from taking up a whole line all for itself. This occasionally (perhaps 1 log in 10) causes the View Log to overlap a bit of the log text. If this bothers you, remove this line. The only cost of removing it is a bit of extra space at the bottom of most logs. */ .LogText + .AlignRight {margin-top: -20px !important} /* I also don't care whether the logger is a premium member, and showing that sometimes forces an extra line in the log entry, so don't show it. This is optional and independent of the other specs. */ .logOwnerBadge {display:none !important} /* All the smily faces in the left column confuse me because it's the same image as for the Found It log, so don't show it. But then the counts need to be bolder. This is optional and independent of the other specs. */ .logOwnerStats img {display:none !important} .logOwnerStats {font-weight: bold !important; color:#000000 !important} /* All the following adjustments to text size and color are optional and independent of the other specs. */ /* Make the log date display larger and bolder. */ .LogDate {font-weight: bold !important; font-size: 100% !important; color: #000000 !important} /* Move the log date closer to the log type. */ .LogType {width:20% !important} .LogType + div {width:76% !important; text-align:left !important} /* Well, now it's obvious that the log type is not black either. I'm a man, I can fix that. http://emmanuelfonte.posterous.com/im-a-man-i-can-fix-that */ .LogType {color: #000000 !important} /* and the log text too ... */ .LogText {color: black !important} Edward
  13. One thing I notice is that there's no "ignore" link or button on the Challenge page. Since there's such a link on a cache page, many may be looking for it on the Challenge page. When they don't find it, they look for something else to have the same effect. The only negative links are "thumbs down" and "flag". I can "accept" a Challenge, but I cannot "decline" or "ignore" it. So how many are clicking thumbs down simply because there's no "ignore"? I doubt this is the top factor, and might only be a small one, but it probably should be on the list. You can't assume that everyone reads the detailed description, not even close. cezanne has described a common phenomenon in Vienna, the vote that really means "I live here and don't want to be bothered". How many of these would just "ignore" if that option were available? Seems to me that while omitting the "ignore" option initially might not have been a problem on its own, that it may interact badly with the voting system. Edward
  14. I've seen followup comments on the CSS I've posted for adjusting the log layout, so here's my latest. In addition to the previous functions, it removes the smily next to the find count (which I find confusing because it's the same icon as in the log type) and removes the display of "member", "premium member", "reviewer", and whatever else can go there. See details in the comments in the code. /* Make avatars on logs just totally vanish. I don't know whether this prevents the download. */ .logOwnerAvatar {display:none !important} /* Tighten up the spacing in the log. Readability is not reduced at all, due to the alternating background colors and the bold log type. */ .LogDisplayRight .LogText {min-height: 0 !important; padding-top: 0 !important; margin-bottom: 0 !important} /* Try to stop the View Log from taking up a whole line all for itself. This occasionally (perhaps 1 log in 10) causes the View Log to overlap a bit of the log text. If this bothers you, remove this line. The only cost of removing it is a bit of extra space at the bottom of most logs. */ .LogText + .AlignRight {margin-top: -20px !important} /* I also don't care whether the logger is a premium member, and showing that sometimes forces an extra line in the log entry, so don't show it. This is optional and independent of the other specs. */ .logOwnerBadge {display:none !important} /* All the smily faces in the left column confuse me because it's the same image as for the Found It log, so don't show it. But then the counts need to be bolder. This is optional and independent of the other specs. */ .logOwnerStats img {display:none !important} .logOwnerStats {font-weight: bold !important; color:#000000 !important} /* All the following adjustments to text size and color are optional and independent of the other specs. */ /* Make the log date display larger and bolder. */ .LogDate {font-weight: bold !important; font-size: 100% !important; color: #000000 !important} /* Well, now it's obvious that the log type is not black either. I'm a man, I can fix that. http://emmanuelfonte.posterous.com/im-a-man-i-can-fix-that */ .LogType {color: #000000 !important} /* and the log text too ... */ .LogText {color: black !important} Edward
  15. I can't help with the dates, but if you don't want to see the counts, this CSS will do it. .logOwnerStats {display:none !important} Edward
  16. In Windows Vista, I found a file C:\Users\Edward Reid\AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\User Data\Default\User StyleSheets\Custom.css It's empty, so I assume it works the same as the file that niraD found. I can verify that pasting the CSS I posted earlier into this file worked. In fact, it was pretty impressive -- didn't have to reload the page or anything; Chrome just noticed that the custom CSS had changed and applied it before I could even bring Chrome back to the front. Obviously this is custom CSS for all sites. However, the class names in this CSS are specific enough that it's unlikely to be applied anywhere else. I found a discussion thread on the topic of site-specific CSS in Chrome. It said the feature does not exist -- the thread is a couple of years old, but I haven't found anything to say it's outdated. The thread includes a post about an extension which might enable site-specific CSS, though I didn't read the post closely enough to say for sure. I agree with those who want to see the log date more clearly, so I've added CSS for that too. Here's the complete CSS with the log date code added. Oh, and also code to make the log type black ... I really get tired of web "designers" using non-black text just because it's fashionable even though there's no question that lower contrast makes reading harder, and we already read 30% slower on screen than on paper ... oh, you wanted the code instead of the rant. /* Make avatars on logs just totally vanish. I don't know whether this prevents the download. */ .logOwnerAvatar {display:none} /* Tighten up the spacing in the log. Readability is not reduced at all, due to the alternating background colors and the bold log type. */ .LogDisplayRight .LogText {min-height: 0 !important; padding-top: 0 !important; margin-bottom: 0 !important} /* Try to stop the View Log from taking up a whole line all for itself. This occasionally (perhaps 1 log in 10) causes the View Log to overlap a bit of the log text. If this bothers you, remove this line. The only cost of removing it is a bit of extra space at the bottom of most logs. */ .LogText + .AlignRight {margin-top: -20px !important} /* Make the log date display larger and bolder. */ .LogDate {font-weight: bold !important; font-size: 100% !important; color: #000000 !important} /* Well, now it's obvious that the log type is not black either. I'm a man, I can fix that. http://emmanuelfonte.posterous.com/im-a-man-i-can-fix-that */ .LogType {color: #000000 !important} /* and the log text too ... */ .LogText {color: black !important} It's very likely possible to do other things like repositioning the log date and the View Log link, but for various reasons those are not as trivial as the above. Incidentally, someone said the year is present in log dates when the log is more than a year old. I'm seeing "December 31, 2010" (can see it now that I've made the date easier to read), so the year is included when it's not the current year. Edward
  17. Yes, !important applies to the attribute, not to the entire set. It means that the user setting should override the page setting. If the page doesn't set the attribute explicitly (allows the default to apply), then your setting will work without the !important. If it sets the attribute explicitly, then you need the !important. Edward
  18. When you're reading logs, following what happened often depends on knowing whether people visited on the same date. "About a year ago" doesn't tell this. If something went wrong with the cache, knowing the exact sequence of events can help. With the vague date indications, it's not clear whether logs from "about a year ago" are even in correct sequence -- they probably are, but it's not clear from the display. If a TB went AWOL, it can be important to be able to match TB log dates with cache log dates. When I'm reading logs, it's often of interest whether the visit was made on a weekend or weekday, holiday, etc. As for the logs formatting, while some people use ABP, others don't. Most browsers allow you to install a user CSS file for each site (though the only browser I can provide instructions for is Opera). I posted this CSS in another thread: /* Make avatars on logs just totally vanish. I don't know whether this prevents the download. */ .logOwnerAvatar {display:none} /* Tighten up the spacing in the log. Readability is not reduced at all, due to the alternating background colors and the bold log type. */ .LogDisplayRight .LogText {min-height: 0 !important; padding-top: 0 !important; margin-bottom: 0 !important} /* Try to stop the View Log from taking up a whole line all for itself. This occasionally (perhaps 1 log in 10) causes the View Log to overlap a bit of the log text. If this bothers you, remove this line. The only cost of removing it is a bit of extra space at the bottom of most logs. */ .LogText + .AlignRight {margin-top: -20px !important} Edward
  19. You really don't care? I find that very sad. Is geocaching really just a technical activity to you, and nothing to do with the people? You seem to have the idea that you can redefine a word that people have been using, and that people will just drift to your meaning. In the entire history of language, attempts to control the way people use words have never worked. NEVER! Ten years from now, we will still be seeing the confusion between challenges and challenge caches (unless gc.com just decides to get rid of challenge caches to dictate how people use the word). Grammar book authors have been making rules for how words are used for centuries, and 95% of the population still ignores them; their primary legacy has been innumerable arguments over what is "right" and "wrong" in usage. You won't do any better. You started knowing you were creating a confusion but thinking that people would just learn to use the terms the way you do. You were right about the confusion but wrong about being able to make people change their language. The fact that challenge caches can be abused should not be used to denigrate them, as you appear to be doing. Traditional caches can be abused too -- should we avoid all traditional caches because some are abused? I agree that a challenge cache should relate to its geographical area. The two challenge caches I've placed are intimately related to their location, and the prerequisites cannot be met anywhere else. One of them is even self-referential: it would be part of its own prerequisites except that would make it impossible. At the same time, IN PRACTICE many caches with prerequisites which could be satisfied anywhere, in fact are mostly done locally. For example, "lonely hearts" caches (prerequisite is to find caches at 1-12 month intervals from previous finders) are in my observation generally found by people in the local area. Sure, the prerequisite could be tightened to allow qualifying finds only on caches within say 100 miles, but in practice that doesn't seem to be an issue. Furthermore, some challenge caches actively support other caches. The Lonely Hearts challenge caches are a good example: they encourage people to find caches which aren't on the general radar. So at least challenge caches are in practice usually location-tied. By contrast, Worldwide Challenges are by definition not location-tied at all! Yes, there was a strong desire to bring back virtual caches (not shared by yours truly, but widely shared), but I saw little interest in bringing back locationless caches. So while you decry the location-weak nature of some challenge caches, you reinstate a far less popular version of locationless caches. What's the point? Edward
  20. I've suggested repeatedly that the only thing wrong with Waymarking is that it's a separate web site, and I'm not going to take the time to look stuff up on two sites. If the two were integrated, if the maps showed both (optionally) and the buttons to select types included WM types, and if PQs could include WM things, then I'd probably do a lot of waymarks. Edward
  21. Here ya go. For those wanting to remove excess white space from logs and able to install user CSS, this code removes a lot. See comments in the code for details. It includes the avatar killer I posted earlier and also trims space around the log text. The parts between /* ... */ are purely for human consumption and can be removed if having the comments lying around disturbs you. I don't know anything about ABP, but from the examples I've seen posted here, I gather it's just a slightly easier syntax that gets converted into CSS, so my CSS can probably be rewritten in ABP. /* Make avatars on logs just totally vanish. I don't know whether this prevents the download. */ .logOwnerAvatar {display:none} /* Tighten up the spacing in the log. Readability is not reduced at all, due to the alternating background colors and the bold log type. */ .LogDisplayRight .LogText {min-height: 0 !important; padding-top: 0 !important; margin-bottom: 0 !important} /* Try to stop the View Log from taking up a whole line all for itself. This occasionally (perhaps 1 log in 10) causes the View Log to overlap a bit of the log text. If this bothers you, remove this line. The only cost of removing it is a bit of extra space at the bottom of most logs. */ .LogText + .AlignRight {margin-top: -20px !important} Edward
  22. Avatars: I don't know what ABP is, but the CSS rule to disable them is .logOwnerAvatar {display:none} AFAIK all browsers have the ability to install user style sheets. Just add this to the user style sheet for gc.com. I'm not sure if this will avoid the download, and it won't restore all the lost space, but it helps a lot. I don't know if anyone outside GS HQ actually wanted these -- it looks like just another of those trendy things dreamed up to sell higher speeds of Internet connectivity. But if a couple of people at GSHQ really want it, at least make it a user option! Log dates: yeah, I know OpinioNate has promised to bring them back. What disturbs me is that such a bone-headed idea made it into release. For goodness sake, there's no shortage of people who would have been willing to answer the question of "do you need exact dates". That the question wasn't asked indicates acute problems in the development process at Groundspeak. It really looks like another example of following fashion. Challenges: I'll reserve judgment on the design, but calling the new thing Challenges was another pretty bone-headed idea. Not in the same class with removing log dates, but bad. Telling people "this word means what I say it does, not what you use it for" never works. NEVER!!! Ten years from now, one of the most frequently started threads will involve the confusion. Calling them Baba Yaga would have been better -- like "challenges" it doesn't mean anything, but at least it's not confused with anything in the geocaching world. Edward
  23. There's a locally-run Country Dollar Store a mile from my house, right on the edge of the neighborhood. (In the city, despite the name.) It's still literally everything $1 ... plus 7.5% sales tax. If you want something specific, of course you won't find it, but they have some pretty neat stuff. It's crowded when the nearby school lets out. I recently stocked a new ammo can for $10 and got several logs about how good the swag was. Is the thread adequately hijacked? Edward
  24. (Yeah, I know this was posted months ago.) While I agree with your statements about photochemical reactions, you go too far with the "98%". Basically polyethylene, especially LDPE but also HDPE, deteriorates badly in sunlight. But PET/PETE holds up very well -- that's peanut butter jars. (PB jar lids are some other material but they seem to hold up too.) Polypropylene (PP) holds up in sunlight as long as it's reasonably thick and well made. Vinyl (PVC) seems to do well in practice, although the instructions on PVC pipe say not to install exposed to sunlight IIRC. ABS is good. Polycarbonate is good. I found one cache in a container which originally held microwave frozen food. The top was OK -- it's PETE. Don't know what the bottom is; it was already cracked. Of course it never sealed. Didn't get a picture of it. It finally got archived. Here's an example of what happens to Gladware-type containers. This one falls in the category of thin and poorly made -- these containers are usually PP, which in theory should hold up well, but in this thinness and quality do not. The photo doesn't even show the many shards of the blue lid that were lying around on the ground. The owner did replace this one and AFAIK it's doing well, though it hasn't been found in about 21 months ... hey, does anyone need a 21-month cache for a challenge? Edward
  25. really? Well, of course you just thought the forums were down. Edward
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